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Tuesday - March 26, 2019

Archive for the ‘ Health & Nutrition ’ Category

 

Low Gluten or No Gluten?

March 21st, 2019

Today, about three million Americans are gluten free, 72 per cent of whom are classified as PWAGs: people without celiac disease avoiding gluten. Aside from celiac disease, there are other conditions impacted by gluten in the diet–rheumatoid arthritis, Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis and other autoimmune disorders. Gluten is a mixture of two different proteins present in cereal grains, especially wheat, rye, and barley. For those with sensitivities, gluten causes inflammation and damage in the intestinal tracts and other parts of the body. One in 133 people have celiac disease, an autoimmune disease... Read More

Three Tips to Spring Clean Your Diet

March 14th, 2019

The spring equinox (also called the March equinox or vernal equinox) falls on Wednesday, March 20, 2019, at 5:58 P.M. EST. This event marks the astronomical first day of spring in the Northern Hemisphere.  Fun fact: the word equinox comes from the Latin meaning “equal night,” referring to the fact that the length of the day and night are nearly equal in most parts of the world. Since spring is almost here for most of us, it’s a great time to think about ways to spruce up our eating habits a bit.  Here are three ways to refine your diet this spring. Make small edits to your diet.  We all... Read More

Stroke: Not A Senior Citizen’s Health Issue

March 7th, 2019

This week a 90s heartthrob died of a massive stroke. Luke Perry was a relatively young 52 when he suffered a massive stroke. While that seems quite young, ten percent of strokes happen in adults younger than 45.  The causes are many, but the prevalence of diabetes and obesity are largely to blame as well as smoking or, more rarely, an injury that damages a blood vessel in the brain. A stroke happens when a blood vessel in the brain becomes blocked or bursts. When this happens, the impacted part of the brain starts to die, leading to common symptoms such as numbness or difficulty with speech.  A... Read More

Writing Things Down Is Better for Your Memory

March 1st, 2019

If you are of a certain age, you remember when computers were huge mainframes in the computer science lab, you took a typewriter to college, and you wrote notes by hand in class. Technology has presented us with many modern opportunities to take notes – laptops, tablets, phones, watches.  While we have many options at our disposal, science is proving that the best way to take notes for retaining knowledge is a good, old-fashioned paper and pen. Studies of memory retention using a variety of different tools for note taking show that note-taking by hand improves retention in almost all circumstances.... Read More

Is Breakfast the Most Important Meal of the Day?

February 21st, 2019

Recently, an article in Forbes magazine highlighted a study in Australia that claimed, when it came to weight loss, there was no significant difference in people assigned to skip breakfast and those assigned to eat it. Some in the intermittent fasting community say you should not eat anything before 11AM, so your eating cycle can go on later in the day and make you less likely to break the fast before bedtime. While these assertions may be true, there are some good reasons to eat breakfast. There are studies that show those who eat earlier in the day lose more weight than those who eat later in... Read More

Biosensors Could Make Staying Healthy a Little Easier

February 14th, 2019

If you look closely at a Gatorade commercial featuring Serena Williams called “You Fuel Us, We’ll Fuel You,” you may have noticed she is wearing a small patch.  That patch is a biosensor being used as a health monitor—in this case, by assessing sweat. Biosensors are currently being tested in athletes, but have other applications in the world of health. The sensor itself is a soft, flexible patch that adheres to the skin and is placed directly on the forearm or back. It’s a little larger than a quarter and about the same thickness. Fluids can be collected non-invasively and many... Read More

Three Weird Things That May Predict Heart Disease

February 7th, 2019

It’s February, the month we celebrate matters of the heart. Valentine’s Day aside, February is also American Heart Month and Go Red for Women Day, the American Heart Association’s initiative to increase women’s heart health awareness. What better time to talk about that thing that makes you tick? The Centers for Disease Control identifies cardiovascular disease as the number one killer of Americans. Most Americans know the most common indicators of heart trouble, such as high blood pressure, high blood cholesterol, weight, and diabetes. Instead of sharing traditional heart health tips,... Read More

Facts About Food That Can Influence Your Diet

January 30th, 2019
fruits and vegetables

Did you know that a green (unripe) banana confers its own unique health benefits? Green bananas are a good source of fiber, vitamins, and minerals, and contain resistant starch which cannot be broken down by enzymes in your digestive system and, therefore, acts more like fiber. Including foods high in resistant starch in your diet may reduce your risk of diabetes and heart disease by aiding in blood sugar control and lowering blood cholesterol levels. Bananas have higher levels of antioxidants as they ripen. Fully ripened bananas produce a substance called Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF). TNF regulates... Read More

What Is the Slow-Carb Diet?

January 24th, 2019
asparagus and steak

Low- and no- carb eating is all the rage these days.  Ditching carbs is tough to do-over the long haul. For starters, adults in the U.S. get about 50 percent of their daily calories from carbohydrates. If you cut out all carbs, you’ll have to give up fruits, vegetables, whole grains and beans — which are the building blocks of a healthy diet. If you’re a woman, you may be doing yourself a disservice giving up carbs.  For women, particularly peri-menopausal or menopausal women, carbs stimulate serotonin production in the brain. Serotonin is a neurotransmitter that governs our mood.  Some... Read More

Monthly Micro Resolutions Can Make Achieving Your Health Goals Easier

January 17th, 2019

Already struggling with your New Year’s resolution?  Most will abandon their resolutions as early as February.  If you feel like you keep setting goals for yourself and then failing to achieve them, instead of doing the same thing (can you say the definition of insanity?), try something new! Micro resolutions are small goals that you can achieve in 30 days or less.  The goal of the micro resolution is that each goal snowballs into the next, creating a pattern for success.  If you don’t accomplish your goal, you start with a clean slate the next month.  Here are some tips for successfully... Read More

Five Tips for Eating Healthy without Breaking the Bank

January 10th, 2019
chicken plate

Did you resolve to eat healthier in 2019?  Eating healthy is one of the most popular New Year’s resolutions, right up there with “spend less money” and “exercise more.” Healthy eating can be expensive if you’re on a tight budget, but it can be done with a little thought and creativity.  Here are some easy tips for eating healthy on a budget: Plan your meals. If you plan your meals, build a shopping list, and only buy what’s on the list, you’ll spend less on stuff you don’t need.  You can save even more if you take a look at what’s on sale at your grocery store... Read More

Four Tips for Staying Up When the Weather Gets You Down

January 3rd, 2019
girl with hand pressed to window

It’s more than just a song lyric—rainy days really can get you down! Weather has a definite effect on our emotions. About 9 percent of people fall into a “rain haters” category, a group that feels angrier and less happy on days with more precipitation.  When it’s dark and dreary, some of us are more susceptible to feeling lonely or down. A lack of sunlight can cause Seasonal Affective Disorder, or SAD. This mood disorder usually affects people during the months when daylight becomes more scarce. When exposed to less sunlight, your body produces more melatonin, the hormone which... Read More

Consider A Pegan Diet

December 20th, 2018

Have you heard of a Pegan Diet?  It is a blend of paleo and vegan. I know that may sound crazy, since paleo is very meat focused and vegan is no animal products at all! Pegan is the middle ground between the two. The term was coined by Dr. Mark Hyman who recommends dietary guidelines that combine the best of both “paleo” and “vegan” ways of eating. Dr. Hyman is a physician and best-selling author of books such as Eat Fat, Get Thin: Why the Fat We Eat Is the Key to Sustained Weight Loss and Vibrant Health.  He is also the founder and medical director of The UltraWellness Center in Massachusetts. Here... Read More

Access to Green Space is a Predictor of Well-being

December 13th, 2018

People often struggle to find ways to preserve health and happiness when they live in stress-inducing urban environments. Recent research suggests parks have a unique capacity to enhance physical health and foster a sense of community for city dwellers. A study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine and the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, used information from the Gallup-Healthways Well-being Index, the U.S. Census Bureau, and a variety of other sources and combined this analysis with city-level data on park quantity, quality and accessibility... Read More

The Truth About Working From Home: Is It Killing You?

December 9th, 2018

Denver is one of the most concentrated areas of the country for telecommuting.  Pop into a neighborhood café or brewery on any given day and the evidence is clear…we are a culture of remote workers looking for virtual offices.  A few months ago I started working from home, and it’s not my first swing at it.  There are WONDERFUL things about working from home, and there are tragic consequences.  Read on for the lowdown! The Good! The Commute: It’s no secret that hectic commutes result in stress-related health issues, effected work performance, and a negative impact on personal relationships. ... Read More

It’s Natural to Crave Sugar! – 4 Tips for Managing Sugar Intake

December 6th, 2018

Sugar is both a delightful treat and the bane of our existence because, while it is delicious, it also seems to be addictive. Scientific evidence is mounting to suggest that too much added sugar in our diets could lead to true addiction. Sugar is linked to addiction because when we eat it, dopamine and opioids are released into the bloodstream. Dopamine is a neurotransmitter that creates a reward associated with addictive behavior. Once dopamine is released into the system, it gives us a pleasurable “high.” Why do we crave sugar? The main natural source of sugar is fruit. Thousands of years... Read More

An Inspired Wellness Wishlist

December 5th, 2018
Wellness wishlist

What better gift than a gift of wellness? What better reason to treat yourself to a gift than simply because you deserve it? There’s no need to wait for your birthday or the holidays to roll around, especially when the reward is good for your well-being — good for your mind, your body, and your soul. We all deserve to treat ourselves now and again, and the fact that we are doing it for the sake of own health minimizes the guilt and maximizes the benefits. The following are just a few suggestions for wellness items to add to your personal wishlist. Your mind Of course, you want to take care... Read More

3 Tips This Holiday Season To Do Less, And Enjoy More

November 29th, 2018

Thanksgiving kicks off weeks of eating, shopping, parties, and family gatherings. Most people feel a mix of joy and anxiety right before and during the holidays. Statistics show that up to 69 percent of people are stressed by lack of time, 69 percent are stressed by a lack of money, and 51 percent are stressed out about the pressure to give or get gifts. A British study examined people’s stress levels and other behavior during the holiday season. For anyone feeling less than on top of things, the turning point from mild to severe stress comes on December 18 and peaks on Christmas Day. According... Read More

Is Eating Your Placenta Beneficial?

November 15th, 2018

Over the past decade there has been growing interest in natural childbirth. As part of that debate many have questioned whether doctors should dispose of a placenta after birth. Many mammals consume their placenta — referred to as placentophagy — and there are proponents who argue that humans should also engage in this practice. What is the science of placentophagy? Is it safe to consume a placenta? Is it beneficial? The placenta is an organ shared by a pregnant mother and her growing fetus, functioning as the lungs, gastrointestinal system, liver, and kidneys of the developing child. Proponents... Read More


5 Ways to Improve Quality of Life While Living with Lung Disease

November 10th, 2018

Millions of people living with lung disease experience symptoms that diminish their quality of life. From shortness of breath and difficulty breathing to persistent, painful coughs, and recurrent pneumonia, the symptoms of lung diseases like COPD and emphysema make it hard to complete the simplest daily tasks. However, people living with lung disease don’t have to accept their symptoms lying down. With good self-management practices, lung disease patients can significantly improve their quality of life. Here are five practices that improve daily life for people with lung disease: Getting Vaccinated Contracting... Read More