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Tuesday - August 20, 2019

Archive for the ‘ Health & Wellbeing ’ Category

 

Three Important Drugs in the News

August 16th, 2019

Science has given us so many tools to make our lives better and healthier.  Information about how we address health issues now and how we can address them better in the future is all over the news right now.  Here are three important news stories that are influencing the conversation about major health issues. New treatment for antibiotic resistant bacteria With antibiotic resistant bacteria on the rise, scientists have been searching for new ways to treat bacterial infections.  One promising drug is bithionol. Previously used to treat parasitic infections in horses, bithionol is now being... Read More

3 Health Tips for Going Back to School

August 8th, 2019

It’s almost here again…back to school. Getting your kids back in the school year groove doesn’t have to be stressful as long as you plan ahead for classes, sports, and getting up early. Here are some tips to make your back to school strategy operate smoothly. Get back on your school year sleep schedule. Pediatricians recommend that children age 6 to 12 get 9 to 12 hours of sleep a night, and that teens get 8 to 10 hours a night. If it’s still light outside when your kids go to bed, consider light blocking shades to help your child’s body send the appropriate signals for sleep.  All devices... Read More

3 Reasons to Get Vaccinated

August 1st, 2019

August is National Immunization Awareness Month, an annual observance to highlight the importance of vaccination for people of all ages. Many Americans have embraced the myth that vaccines cause a number of conditions, including autism. This fear originated with a 1997 study published by Andrew Wakefield, a British surgeon. Published in The Lancet, a prestigious medical journal, the study suggested that the measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) vaccine was increasing autism in British children. The paper has since been discredited due to serious errors in the way the study was conducted and conflicts of... Read More

Vitamin D–A Supplement That Works!

July 25th, 2019

Nearly 114 million Americans—roughly half the adult population—take at least one nutritional supplement. Scientific investigations conducted have failed to confirm that supplements, particularly multi-vitamins, work. So, if multi-vitamins are not effective, are there any supplements that are effective? The answer is yes! About 70% of Americans don’t get enough vitamin D. Typically, we get vitamin D by producing it in our skin from sun exposure. Vitamin D is needed to absorb calcium from the intestines, making it a very important vitamin, but it’s found in very few foods and is hard to obtain... Read More

Three Ways Technology is Improving Your Healthcare

July 18th, 2019

The World Health Organization (WHO) defines health technology as “the application of organized knowledge and skills in the form of devices, medicines, vaccines, procedures and systems developed to solve a health problem and improve quality of lives.” We live in an era where technology touches our lives almost everywhere, but in terms of healthcare, we have more access than ever to our healthcare providers and tools to guide our personal health strategy.  For example, mobile apps give us access to price comparisons for prescription medicines. Fitness devices and apps can give us feedback on... Read More

Four Reasons You Might Be Suffering from Congestion

July 10th, 2019

Feeling a little stuffy?  Congestion is a common problem, as anyone who has had a cold or suffers from allergies can attest.  Congestion refers to a feeling of stuffiness in the nasal or breathing passageways. Nasal congestion, stuffiness, or a runny nose is generally caused by increased blood volume to the vessels that line the passages inside the nose. There are a number of causes of congestion that we all know: sinus infection, cold or flu, and allergies.  There are a few other reasons you may be snotty that fall into the category of “none of the above.” You might be able to breathe easier... Read More

Healthy Living: Boost Your Brain with Lion’s Mane

July 8th, 2019

Brain fog: it’s a thing. Especially during a busy workweek, where too many to-do items have a tendency to sneak up on you. Maybe you’ve been staring at the computer screen for far too long and are starting to get that glazed-over feeling of your mind going numb. We all go through it, especially me, and during the times when my morning cup of coffee simply isn’t cutting it, more often than not I rely on something else. Something much stronger in potency, yet healthier, to dust out the mental clutter and enhance my concentration on tasks ahead. That something is lion’s mane mushroom. It wouldn’t... Read More

Summer Sunscreen Facts

July 4th, 2019

For pale faces like me, sunscreen is an absolute necessity. I would not be able to enjoy my outdoor lifestyle without serious protection for my skin. Recent research found that some ingredients from sun protection products are being absorbed into your body. Is this a risk to your health? Researchers say these sunscreen ingredients– avobenzone, oxybenzone, octocrylene and ecamsule – are present in the blood after sunscreen application at levels that would, under current Food and Drug Administration (FDA) guidelines, trigger a requirement for further safety testing. Unfortunately, sunscreen... Read More

Time to Feel Better: 5 Easy Circadian Rhythm Reset Secrets

June 28th, 2019

Do you continuously wake up at 5AM and feel thoroughly rested—officially ready to start your day? If you do, it’s likely that you’ve established strong sleep-wake routines that keep your circadian rhythm(s) in check. For those that answered a firm no, it might be time to reconsider switching up or completely replacing some of your daily rituals. Why? How much sleep we get and when we get it correlates directly with our metabolic health and overall liveliness in the long run. If you want to feel and perform at your best (But really, who would say no to that?), read on for some circadian rhythm... Read More

Are Optimists Healthier Than Pessimists?

June 27th, 2019

Are you a glass half-full person? In other words, are you hopeful and confident about the future?  If so, you might be healthier than your friends who believe that the worst will happen. Many studies have reported that optimism influences health. Among the findings:   Highly pessimistic men were three times more likely to develop hypertension. People with positive emotions had lower blood pressures. The most pessimistic men were more than twice as likely to develop heart disease compared with the most optimistic.   It is hard to know if optimism is the result of good health, or if... Read More

Three Things You Might Not Know About Coconuts

June 20th, 2019

Coconut is a unique fruit because it is available year-round rather than during a season. While loosely referred to as a fruit, a coconut is actually a drupe.  A drupe is a fruit that contains a seed. Also called a stone fruit, other drupes include plums, cherries, almonds, and olives. Botanically speaking, a coconut can be a fruit, a nut, and a seed. Coconut has been denoted with many benefits, some controversial.  For example, coconut oil has been touted as a good fat for cooking.  It is high in healthy fats that can boost fat burning and provide your body and brain with quick energy. They... Read More

Do You Need a PSA Test?

June 13th, 2019

Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer among men. Until 2012, the screening for prostate cancer, called the Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) test, was the standard for predicting prostate cancer for men 55 and older. Because PSA is a protein produced by both cancerous and noncancerous tissue in the prostate, it was determined to be inaccurate in detecting prostate cancer.  Normal PSA is 4 nanograms per milliliter of blood, but a high PSA levels doesn’t always mean cancer and low levels don’t always mean a healthy prostate. In 2012, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommended... Read More

Camping Strategies for Your Health and Safety

June 5th, 2019

It’s almost summer, a time for outdoor activities including sleeping in the great outdoors.  Camping helps us refresh our mind and soul. There’s nothing better than seeing the wilderness wake up as the sun lights up the sky! Camping requires some preparation to keep you warm, safe, and healthy. If you are planning a camping trip this year, keep in mind these essential health and safety tips.   Assess your fitness level.  If you are planning a particularly strenuous trip, make sure you are fit enough to withstand the strain of the journey. You may want to consider working with a fitness... Read More

4 Health Facts About E-Cigarettes

May 30th, 2019

May 31st is World No Tobacco Day.  7 out of 10 smokers say they want to quit. Quitting tobacco, including chewing tobacco, is one of the best things you can do for your health. Smoking in particular harms nearly every organ in your body, and nearly one-third of deaths from heart disease are the result of smoking and secondhand smoke. Some smokers have switched to e-cigarettes to ease the transition to a smoke-free life.  E-cigarettes are devices that vaporize a nicotine-based liquid which is then inhaled, much like a cigarette.  Is the e-cigarette a better alternative to smoking tobacco?  Here... Read More

Three Reasons to Consider Drinking Green Tea

May 23rd, 2019

For me, summer is the time when I drink iced tea. I like all kinds of tea on a hot day – iced black tea, half and half (aka Arnold Palmer), and those great shaken teas at coffee shops. Tea is awesome and can be healthy. In fact, I’ve found green tea particularly appealing because it is so good for you. Green tea is made from Camellia sinensis leaves and buds that have not undergone the same withering and oxidation process used to make oolong and black teas. For those interested in managing their caffeine intake, eight ounces of green tea contain about 35 mg of caffeine, about half the amount... Read More

Everything You Wanted to Know About Chiggers (And Maybe More Than You Wanted to Know)

May 16th, 2019

On a recent trip to visit my family, I brought home an unwelcome souvenir–chigger bites.  Chiggers are mites, but they have many nicknames like harvest mites, harvest bugs, harvest lice, mower’s mites, or red bugs. Technically chiggers are arachnids, in the same family as spiders and ticks. Since I haven’t experienced chigger bites since I was young, I had forgotten how heinous those bites can be.  I want to share my experience with you, so you can avoid a week-long itch fest if you get chigger bites. Where chiggers reside. Chiggers live in every country. Their favorite spots are... Read More

Tips for Reducing Anxiety Through Diet

May 9th, 2019

The National Institute of Mental Health reports that 40 million adults—18% of the population—struggle with anxiety. Anxiety is normal; job interviews, public speaking and other everyday occurrences can cause anxiety.  It only becomes a problem when it extends beyond worry in an unreasonable, uncontrollable way. Anxiety can be a symptom of another mental illness, such as panic disorders, post-traumatic stress disorder, phobias, or obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD).  Anxiety and anxiety disorders are the most common behavioral health issues in the U.S. There are some important health habits... Read More

Brushing Your Teeth Twice a Day Lowers Your Health Risk

May 2nd, 2019

Thirty percent of Americans only brush their teeth once daily.  That is certainly enough to reduce the level of plaque-causing bacteria–it takes about 24 hours to develop on teeth–but you are more likely to have cavities if you only brush once daily, particularly if you are only brushing in the morning.  If you are going to brush once a day, it should be at night. It is always tempting to take a few shortcuts to simplify our lives.  I’d like to make the case that brushing once daily is not enough. Let’s talk about the health benefits of brushing twice daily. Prevent gum disease.... Read More

Three Simple Ways You Can Help The Environment

April 25th, 2019

This week we celebrated Earth Day, the world’s largest environmental movement. Our impact on the environment is complex and often interrelated.  For example, bees are dying from a variety of factors—pesticides, drought, habitat destruction, nutrition deficit, air pollution, global warming and more. Ninety percent of the world’s food crops are pollinated by bees, and humans are responsible for two major reasons that bees are dying: pesticides and habitat destruction. If bees die out, the world will face a serious food crisis. Our oceans are clogged with plastic, which is harmful to marine... Read More

Everybody Handles Distress Differently

April 18th, 2019

On Monday evening, a massive fire broke out at the Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris.  With about 13 million visitors each year, the cathedral is the city’s most visited monument, and has been part of Paris for more than 800 years. Many across the globe are expressing shock and distress about the burning of such an iconic Gothic structure that housed religious artifacts and works of art, some of which are lost, some moved just in time. When tragedy strikes, some of us never recover from it. The way we cope with these situations differ greatly. Some people immediately fall into a deep depression,... Read More