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Tuesday - December 1, 2020

Posts Tagged With ‘ Colorado ’

 

Eldorado Canyon: What to Know, Where to Go

November 30th, 2020

  It’s time to head out and explore the surrounding parks and trails around Boulder. One of Boulder’s best parks sits a few miles south of the town itself, and boasts beautiful scenery and rich history.   Eldorado Canyon beacons as a mecca for local rock climbers. The state park is renown for its beautiful sandstone walls, pocked with thousands of rock climbing routes. Any serious climbers in Boulder should not pass up a chance to experience the world class routes in Eldorado Canyon.   However, for the more causal adventurer, Eldorado Canyon offers miles of winding trails, easily... Read More

Faces of Boulder – Pic of the Day!

November 28th, 2020

“People have been surprised to find out that I’m gay. Is it based on how I talk? How I dress? Some parts of my personality fits into the perceptions of gay men, like caring about dressing ‘nice’… But what does that actually mean? Sometimes I wonder where I fit in. Am I a portrayal of gay culture?… I’m a gamer. I’m a graphic designer. I live for music. I’m a basic nerd. I am me.” -Dean Dean is a graphic designer originally from Alaska.  Read More

3 Inspired, Innovative, Boulder-Based Inventions

November 27th, 2020

Maybe you already know that the comfortable (and allegedly edible) innovation; the Crocs shoe, was created in Boulder County. Today we’re checking out some less explosive, but equally clever, Boulder-based inventions. This is one smart city, and the products created here prove it! Nimbus Cloud Dome The Nimbus Cloud Dome is a deceptively simple invention created by Boulder resident Cindy Litchfield. As a jewelry maker, she struggled to create close-up, glare-free photos of her products. No one had addressed the problem before, so she took on the challenge. The result was the Nimbus Cloud... Read More

The ULTIMATE Guide to Sledding in Boulder

November 27th, 2020

There’s something intensely satisfying about speeding down a snowy hill on a piece of oversized plastic. You call up your friends, scavenge some sleds from the garage, encase yourself in snow clothes, and embark on your journey towards an incredible sledding hill. Sometimes, however, it’s hard to find the right sledding hill. Much like Goldilocks in The Story of Three Bears, certain sledding hills are too short. Or maybe they’re not steep enough. Maybe they’re even too steep. That’s why I’ve organized a list of the very best sledding hills of Boulder,... Read More

Ten Reasons Why Boulder Rocks

November 27th, 2020

Happy cows may come from California, but happy people come from Boulder. And for good reason! Boulder has so much to offer, it’s no wonder that people here are considered to be among the happiest in the country. Narrowing this list down was the real challenge, but here are ten reasons why Boulder rocks: 1. Hiking, Biking, and Climbing Okay, maybe that’s three reasons, but the main theme here is mountains. Nestled right at the base of the Rockies, Boulder has over 300 miles of hiking and biking trails, and countless opportunities for climbing and bouldering (imagine that). Even if you don’t... Read More

Timeless Pieces of Boulder’s Architectural History

November 25th, 2020

With the holidays over, we figured we should refresh our minds with something different today. Boulder has a very interesting architectural history, especially the university campus. We will touch on some defining Boulder architectural projects which you have probably seen around town. Next time you’re out and about, maybe you’ll encounter some of these oh-so-Boulder building projects. The University Campus Of course we cannot skim Boulder’s architectural past without bringing up the University of Colorado campus. It began with the all-brick Old Main and soon grew into several... Read More

Girl Power!!! The History of Women in Boulder

November 23rd, 2020

In a recent study in Boulder, it was found that the city is leading the nation on gender equity. Currently, the national average for women’s wages are 84% of what men make. In Boulder the average is 88%. Boulder is obviously a special city, leading the nation in multiple avenues from preventative measures for climate change to progressive gender equality. This got me thinking about famous women in Boulder and the steps they have taken to catalyze change in their city and nation. If you were lucky enough to visit the Pioneers: Women Artists in Boulder exhibit last year at the Art Museum at... Read More

Chief Niwot and the Curse of Boulder Valley

November 22nd, 2020

Chief Niwot (which means “Left Hand” in English) was a leader of the Southern Arapaho tribe born around 1825. He spent a great many winters in Boulder Valley, particularly at Valmont Butte, which is considered a sacred site for the Southern Arapaho. In 1851, the United States signed the Treaty of Fort Laramie with the Arapaho, Cheyenne, Crow, Sioux, Assiniboine, Mandan, Hidatsa, and Arikara nations. In it, US government acknowledged that much of the land between Oregon and the Rocky Mountains belonged to these tribes and in return, the Native Americans would allow wagon trains... Read More

Hiking with Dogs in Boulder: What to Know, Where to Go

November 21st, 2020

It’s time to start getting back out on the trails. What better to venture into Boulder’s beautiful open spaces than with a furry friend. Boulder Open Spaces and Mountain Parks offers a sprawling 145 miles of trails to the avid hiker, and up to 90% of those trails are open to dogs. This includes the Chautauqua Meadow, Mt. Sanitas, NCAR trails, Bear Canyon, the Table Mesa Trails and much, much, more.   But, before heading into the great outdoors with your pooch, don’t forget to bring a leash and some doggie bags. While the Open Spaces and Mountain Parks welcome dogs, it is your responsibility... Read More

Where was Boulder’s Dushanbe Teahouse Made?

November 19th, 2020

One of the most common pieces of advice a Boulderite will give to a new resident is “Go check out the Dushanbe Teahouse,” but what’s so special about a teahouse? Well, ours was handcrafted in Tajikistan during the Cold War, and kindly shipped by our sister city of Dushanbe. The rebuilding of the teahouse in Boulder was an awesome accomplishment which nearly did not happen. The idea of a sister city or twin town developed from the Cold War following WWII. The point was to form legal and social bonds between disparate cultures, and even promote relationships between former enemies.... Read More

Are the Boulder Flatirons Remnants of Ancient Beaches?

November 17th, 2020

You will learn how Boulder’s iconic Flatirons formed. Turns out, Boulder was once beachfront property. The Flatirons are Boulder’s favorite portion of the Fountain Formation, a geological formation of mostly red sandstone. This sandstone, more appropriately called “arkose” gets its color from the pinkish feldspar contained it it. This red rock makes up the Red Rocks of Morrison and the Garden of the Gods in Colorado Springs. The Fountain Formation stretches from Colorado Springs all the way to Wyoming. The reddish color is due to the concentration of feldspar in the sandstone,... Read More

6 Famous Boulderites You Should Know

November 17th, 2020

We can’t say for sure if being in Boulder makes you a better or more successful person, but these celebrities from our fair city lend some credibility to the notion. And since we aren’t a gossip site, these won’t all be film and TV stars. We are showing you real people from Boulder who did, and are doing, interesting and popular things with their lives. 3OH!3 Sean Foreman and Nathaniel Motte make up the electronica group 3OH!3, which received national success with their song “Don’t Trust Me”. They gained even more attention when they collaborated with Ke$ha... Read More

Why Does Boulder Have A “Greenbelt”?

November 16th, 2020

You may hear Boulderites referring to a “greenbelt,” but what is that and why does Boulder have one? There was huge population growth in Boulder between 1950 and 1970. This growth was due to the presence of the University of Colorado, the intellectual diversity surrounding the university, and a strong local economy. At an annual growth rate of about 6%, the population of the city was set to double every 11 years or so. Being all about sustainability and preserving local culture, the citizens of Boulder took action against the human tsunami threatening to wash out the city. In 1967... Read More

Why Name a Lady Buffalo “Ralphie”?

November 15th, 2020

This title question, and the more general “Why a buffalo for a mascot?” answered below. Time to brush up on Buff history. Ralphie is the female buffalo mascot for CU Boulder. But why does this female buffalo sport a male name? And why did CU choose a bison mascot in the first place? The tradition began in 1934 when the university newspaper selected “Buffaloes” as the nickname for the university students. Three weeks later, a few students paid a rancher $25 to rent a bison calf and a cowboy to handle her. The calf had to be managed by all 4 students plus the ranch hand... Read More

Drink to Your Health: Cannabis Tea for the Common Cold

November 14th, 2020

Featured Photo Credit: The Weed Blog I spent the majority of last week sick with a sore throat (a name that doesn’t quite do it justice as I felt it would be better described as nightmare throat or raging-baby-dragon-trapped-in-my throat), and I found myself wondering about cannabis teas. First, a couple of facts: Tea alone is packed with benefits for the body. There’s the antioxidants that protect the it from free radicals that can wreak havoc on our health, and let’s not forget about its association with weight loss and a lower risk of heart disease and diabetes. When ingested, such as... Read More

23 of the Best Franchises in America from Colorado

November 14th, 2020

Entrepreneur recently released their list of the top 500 franchises in North America, and Colorado represented with a whopping 23 of the top 500 with franchise headquarters located throughout the state. Dunkin’ ranked number one on the list, with Taco Bell and McDonald’s following close behind.  Read More

What the Heck is a Chautauqua?

November 12th, 2020

Every Boulderite knows that Chautauqua is up on 900 Baseline Road in Boulder, but how did it get there? And what is a Chautauqua anyway? The Chautauqua movement of the late 19th century was an effort to educate rural communities who lacked access to the mass culture being developed in cities. The movement lasted from the 1870s all the way into the 1920s. Rural peoples were hungry for entrainment and brain food, but lacked a way to easily travel because automobiles weren’t widely available until 1910. The “Mother Chautauqua” (which sounds a bit like a spaceship name to me) was... Read More

5 Amazing Restaurants to Try in Boulder

November 11th, 2020

I love going to eat in Boulder (I love going out to eat in general—who doesn’t?) I love a restaurant with a great atmosphere (a great vibe in a restaurant is my SCENE) and affordable food and drink that is quality! Winding down the day at a nice place with a few friends and drinks is one of my favorite pastimes. Sometimes picking out a new restaurant can always feel like a gamble; you never really know what you’ll get, especially because there are plenty of options in Boulder. Well, I got you, because these are some restaurants you certainly must try in Boulder; you really can’t go wrong... Read More

6 Weird and Unique Boulder Laws

November 11th, 2020

When oddly specific things become public problems, local legislation steps in to help. Today we will look at a few odds and ends Boulder city laws had to smooth out over the years. Hopefully we will boost today’s water cooler conversations. Nobody Owns Fifi Dogs in Boulder do not have “owners” according to any public ordinances. You can only be the “guardian” of a dog. This law requiring all public signage to call dog owners “guardians” is the result of animal rights activist calling for reform in the rhetoric surrounding pet relationships. It’s... Read More

5 Craziest Snow Storms in Colorado History

November 10th, 2020

Colorado has had a variety of different, insane snow storms, from late in the year to simply a ton of snow falling at once. Check out these five that you may remember! 1. March 2003 An unexpectedly late snow storm, this storm dumped over 30 inches in Denver nonstop over three days. Surrounding mountain towns saw up to 82 inches! This storm managed to tear a hole in the tent at DIA just from the sheer weight of the snow. 2. Christmas Eve 1982 This cheery winter-weather snow storm brought about two feet of snow with it and effectively shut down the state for a couple days. For most people this... Read More