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Thursday - April 2, 2020

Posts Tagged With ‘ About Boulder ’

 

Faces of Boulder – Pic of the Day!

March 30th, 2020

Meet Amy Lynn Herman. She is a lover of crowds, resourceful creative and a bonafide foodie. An event professional by trade, she has a passion for creating experiences that inspire people to pursue their wildest dreams. Amy Lynn is a deep listener – clearly motivated by personal growth and authentic relationships. She is currently working on a place-making civic art project that uses a white-label app as its framework to create a network of dynamic social interactions.  Read More

Timeless Pieces of Boulder’s Architectural History

March 29th, 2020

With the holidays over, we figured we should refresh our minds with something different today. Boulder has a very interesting architectural history, especially the university campus. We will touch on some defining Boulder architectural projects which you have probably seen around town. Next time you’re out and about, maybe you’ll encounter some of these oh-so-Boulder building projects. The University Campus Of course we cannot skim Boulder’s architectural past without bringing up the University of Colorado campus. It began with the all-brick Old Main and soon grew into several... Read More

6 Things You Realize As Soon As You Leave Boulder

March 29th, 2020

It’s a fantastic city, Boulder, but the longer you live here, the more accustomed you’ll become to mountains, sunshine, craft beer, and socially liberal ideas. You run the risk of forgetting that not every city is environmentally conscious and dog-friendly all the time. Here are some things to keep in mind if you leave town: Not everyone is ultra-fit. Boulder has consistently been ranked as one of the fittest cities in the country. It is a hotbed of marathoners, bikers, runners, hikers, skiers, snowboarders, unicyclers, hoola-hoopers, etc. As soon as you get out of town though, you’ll realize... Read More

A Few of Boulder’s Ghostly Residents

March 28th, 2020

In the spirit of Halloween we are going to detail a few of the haunted places around Boulder. If you dread the macabre, or a haunting close to home is too much for you, there is still time to turn back. At 646 Pearl Street you’ll find the beautiful Arnett-Fullen house. The house was built in 1877 by Willamette Arnett, heir to Anthony Arnett, one of Boulder Land and Trust Company’s founders. Many admire the fusion of architectural styles the house displays. It incorporates Gothic, Victorian, and farmhouse aesthetics. It may also hold a few souls in its walls. Willamette Arnett burned... Read More

Hike of the Week: Mount Sanitas

March 27th, 2020

One of the most popular hiking trails in Boulder is Mount Sanitas, and like many hiking areas, Mount Sanitas gives hikers options for creating the perfect hike. It also, like many other local hiking trails is only a few minutes out of town, but gives one the illusion that he/she is out in the wilderness far away from city life. Because of the trail’s popularity, one will most likely encounter other hikers, making Sanitas a great option for those new to solo hiking. Here are some options when hiking Sanitas: The Loop – This is the most difficult of the options for it involves a steep ascent... Read More

Faces of Boulder – Ollie!

March 26th, 2020

Meet Ollie! Ollie recently moved to Boulder to experience the culture and world-class climbing it has to offer. So far he is loving the decision, and is knocking off classic climbs every day. Besides crushing boulder problems, Ollie loves the atmosphere and hanging out with fellow climbers at the crags. If you don’t know who he is, you can tell you’re climbing with Ollie if his beta for any problem includes at least four heel hooks. Thanks Ollie!  Read More

The Historic Bravery of CU’s Astronauts

March 26th, 2020

CU Boulder has educated 18 astronauts. For some, their studies were for post-graduate research and others sought a Bachelor’s degree. All of these people were nestled in the shadow of the Flatirons preparing for the greatest journey an earthling can make. Though some never returned from the brink of the cosmos. The astronauts of CU Boulder in alphabetical order: Loren Acton, Patrick Baudry (CNES), Vance D. Brand, Scott Carpenter (Project Mercury), Kalapana Chawla (Columbia), Takeo Doi, Samuel T. Durrance, John Herrington, Richard Hieb, Marsha Ivins, John M. Lounge, George Nelson, Ellison... Read More

Why Name a Lady Buffalo “Ralphie”?

March 24th, 2020

This title question, and the more general “Why a buffalo for a mascot?” answered below. Time to brush up on Buff history. Ralphie is the female buffalo mascot for CU Boulder. But why does this female buffalo sport a male name? And why did CU choose a bison mascot in the first place? The tradition began in 1934 when the university newspaper selected “Buffaloes” as the nickname for the university students. Three weeks later, a few students paid a rancher $25 to rent a bison calf and a cowboy to handle her. The calf had to be managed by all 4 students plus the ranch hand... Read More

Are the Boulder Flatirons Remnants of Ancient Beaches?

March 20th, 2020

You will learn how Boulder’s iconic Flatirons formed. Turns out, Boulder was once beachfront property. The Flatirons are Boulder’s favorite portion of the Fountain Formation, a geological formation of mostly red sandstone. This sandstone, more appropriately called “arkose” gets its color from the pinkish feldspar contained it it. This red rock makes up the Red Rocks of Morrison and the Garden of the Gods in Colorado Springs. The Fountain Formation stretches from Colorado Springs all the way to Wyoming. The reddish color is due to the concentration of feldspar in the sandstone,... Read More

Faces of Boulder: GO BUFFS Edition

March 18th, 2020

For this edition of The Faces of Boulder we captured the essence of a CU-Boulder football game day. From frat parties, to families, to Folsom Field, the AboutBoulder team came together to create this special edition that shows CU team pride and a whole lot of Saturday fun. Enjoy the pictures, keep thinking about how you want to get involved with this project and above all, GO BUFFS!                                              Read More

Where was Boulder’s Dushanbe Teahouse Made?

March 18th, 2020

One of the most common pieces of advice a Boulderite will give to a new resident is “Go check out the Dushanbe Teahouse,” but what’s so special about a teahouse? Well, ours was handcrafted in Tajikistan during the Cold War, and kindly shipped by our sister city of Dushanbe. The rebuilding of the teahouse in Boulder was an awesome accomplishment which nearly did not happen. The idea of a sister city or twin town developed from the Cold War following WWII. The point was to form legal and social bonds between disparate cultures, and even promote relationships between former enemies.... Read More

5 Boulder Musicians You Should Know

March 16th, 2020

Josephine Antoine This fair Boulderite was beloved for her incredible rise to fame as a Metropolitan Opera star. After completing her education in Boulder, Antoine went on to earn a Master’s at the Julliard School of Music in NYC. Before her first national appearance, she received a telegram from the mayor of Boulder reading: “Every citizen sends you love and good wishes for your performance tomorrow.” She was a success, and sang the lead in 14 Metropolitan Opera productions. Her singing was featured on national radio stations, and she returned to Boulder to perform at the Colorado... Read More

The Once and Future Architect of Boulder

March 14th, 2020

There is an argument to be made that architects don’t get their due. For every household name, such as Frank Lloyd Wright, there are thousands of people who spend their careers under the radar. Yet even lesser known architects literally and figuratively shape people’s lives by influencing the built environment in which they take place. Charles Haertling is a perfect example of such. His name is one many won’t recognize, but over the course of his life he left an indelible mark on our region. Born on October 21, 1928 in St. Genevieve, Missouri, Haertling joined the Navy in 1946, straight out... Read More

Complex Origins of Boulder’s Fox Theatre

March 14th, 2020

The grand red sign and huge white marquee of Boulder’s Fox Theatre give the building a sense of purpose and permanence. This strong identity boldly contrasts the complex and confusing history of the building itself. This nearly 90 year old space has housed vaudeville acts, a cafe, and a other interesting things in between. The building sitting at 1135 13th Street on The Hill was constructed in 1926 by Adrian G. Diez, but was first owned a Mr. William Beach. Beach sold the building to Diez in 1926, and the building changed hands no less than 8 times to become what it is today. Its first... Read More

3 Boulder NGOs Improving the World

March 13th, 2020

You can find the same business models in all major cities, but the real interests of a community can only be unearthed by digging through their non-profit and/or nongovernmental organizations. Here are a few of Boulder’s which we felt touched on some key interests of this city as a whole. Boulder’s BCycle AboutBoulder has a 3 year history with BCycle, and for good reason. This NGO brought “bikeshare” to Boulder. They now have 39 stations around the city with a fleet of 275 bikes. Simply buy a pass and you’ll get access to unlimited 30-minute bike rental sessions until the pass expires.... Read More

A Changing Boulder in Three Acts

March 11th, 2020

Popular Culture is a large tent. Through its iterations, the term encompasses many things—entertainment, politics, celeb gossip, to name some—via an equally broad galaxy of media, whether new or old. It offers a reflection of the time in which books, productions, and, these days, blog posts are created. Boulder, directly and indirectly, is no exception. You can learn a lot about the perception of our place in the world through its depictions. As such, it’s a worthy exercise to take stock once in a while, by looking at the once and future king of American pop culture: movies. It’s a large... Read More

The Beginnings of Boulder

March 9th, 2020

The story of Boulder, Colorado begins roughly 300 million years ago when our iconic Flatirons formed the seabed of the ocean that covered the better part of the North American continent. This sea, the Western Interior Seaway, ate away at the sandstone beneath it until it began to resemble the shape of the Flatirons we all know and love. It was not until about 40 million years ago that the Flatirons shifted into their present position when the Rocky Mountains were created, becoming part of the “Fountain Formation.” This formation includes other spectacular Colorado landmarks including the Red... Read More

Faces of Boulder- Pic of the Day!

March 5th, 2020

Meet Elizabeth! She was volunteering at the Boulder Creek Fest encouraging kids to sign up for reading camps this summer. “Reading is important to me because it opens a world that you can’t explore anywhere else. It opens opportunities and voices, and gives you a voice that nobody else can ever have or understand unless you put it in words.”  Read More

6 Things That Make CU Alumni Nostalgic

March 5th, 2020

It’s true, college can be the best time of your life. You’re living in the middle of a cultural hub and surrounded by people who know how to have a good time and hate CSU. When it’s all over, here are the things that alumni miss the most: Tailgating. Among the things that CU is good at, winning football games isn’t necessarily up there, but tailgating certainly is. Football games are an all-day event so by 8:30am on Saturday morning, the Hill is popping with music, mimosas, and people getting ready to grill. If you ask around, a lot of students don’t even have tickets to the actual game... Read More

Frozen Dead Guy Days Survival Guide

March 4th, 2020

FDGD is USA Today’s #5 Cultural festival in the country as of 2015. With a Facebook following around 12k and an annual turnout that consumes 50k in merchandise, 100 kegs, 100 cases of beer, and 9k in liquor drinks, things can get wild. We’re here to help you navigate the festival like a pro and get the most bang for any buck you spend. Many of the best events are free anyway! So why should this festival be on your bucket list? We asked a few people at 2016’s FDGD to find out: “I’m from Kansas and my buddies in Colorado said I had to cone this year. They told me... Read More