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Wednesday - April 21, 2021

Posts Tagged With ‘ boulder ’

 

Where was Boulder’s Dushanbe Teahouse Made?

April 21st, 2021

One of the most common pieces of advice a Boulderite will give to a new resident is “Go check out the Dushanbe Teahouse,” but what’s so special about a teahouse? Well, ours was handcrafted in Tajikistan during the Cold War, and kindly shipped by our sister city of Dushanbe. The rebuilding of the teahouse in Boulder was an awesome accomplishment which nearly did not happen. The idea of a sister city or twin town developed from the Cold War following WWII. The point was to form legal and social bonds between disparate cultures, and even promote relationships between former enemies.... Read More

Faces of Boulder: Alex Corren

April 18th, 2021

I sense the amount of time I spend pondering and searching for “my purpose” as abnormal. I return to Paul Graham’s essay, How To Do What You Love, once or twice a month. The segment of Steve Jobs’ legendary Stanford Commencement Speech, Keep Looking, Don’t Settle, is bookmarked to my “revisit often” file. And on my desk sticks a post-it note with, “This is your life. Do what you love, and do it often. If you don’t like something, change it,” from The Holstee Manifesto. Four days before I sat down with Alex Corren, CEO and founder of UnCanny Wellness, over a coffee at Trident... Read More

The Glorious Spectacle of Mt. Sanitas

April 18th, 2021

Mt. Sanitas has always been one of my favorite hiking areas. I grew up near the Goat Trail, which is an alternative path that some people use to access Sanitas, but I decided to use the more widely-used trailhead on Mapleton Avenue when I went to visit last week. Sanitas is a gorgeous mountain. It’s the crème de la crème. It has sprawling grassy fields and jagged mountain peaks- all in one place! On one path, you can choose to go along the easygoing field trail, which requires little to no effort. Alternatively, there is also the steep incline up to the top of Mt. Sanitas, which requires... Read More

3 Oldest Historic Boulder Homes

April 18th, 2021

The Squires-Tourtellot Home The oldest surviving home in Boulder, the Squires-Tourtellot House was built in 1865. This home is the only example in Boulder of New England rural architecture, and includes other features like double-hung windows, six over six wood lintels, louvered shutters, and a steep gable roof with chimneys. The Spruce Street Mansion The Spruce Street Mansion located at 1123 Spruce Street, is Boulder’s oldest remaining brick home which holds architectural significance. This was the home of the Arnett, Soule and Coates families who were early prominent Boulder residents. The... Read More

Faces of Boulder: Meet Shiro

April 17th, 2021

Meet Shiro! Shiro is a digital marketing manager at the local marketing firm, Mondo Marketing and part-time adventurer. Mondo Marketing is a marketing firm in Boulder that focuses on marketing Japanese products from companies with an emphasis on outdoor gear and apparel.  For example, their major account, C3Fit, is a subsidiary of the company Goldwin, who is the distributor of North Face and Helly Hanson in Japan. Shiro first moved to Boulder in the fall of 2010 from the Seattle, WA area, initially to start school at CU Boulder.  While working part-time at the local Japanese restaurant Amu... Read More

New To Yoga? A 3-Step Beginner’s Guide For Starting Out

April 17th, 2021

  I remember the first time I unrolled a yoga mat. I was eighteen years old, shy, and slightly terrified. This feeling is not uncommon. In fact, it’s quite normal when tackling unfamiliar territory of any kind. Yoga, as a discipline, is made up of several unique layers, with Asana (physical postures) being one of, if not the most popular (alongside meditation: Dhyana). As a multifaceted practice, it may feel overwhelming to know where to begin if you’re a new student. What approach do you take first in order to reap benefits in the long run without hindrance? For the purposes of introducing... Read More

Complex Origins of Boulder’s Fox Theatre

April 17th, 2021

The grand red sign and huge white marquee of Boulder’s Fox Theatre give the building a sense of purpose and permanence. This strong identity boldly contrasts the complex and confusing history of the building itself. This nearly 90 year old space has housed vaudeville acts, a cafe, and a other interesting things in between. The building sitting at 1135 13th Street on The Hill was constructed in 1926 by Adrian G. Diez, but was first owned a Mr. William Beach. Beach sold the building to Diez in 1926, and the building changed hands no less than 8 times to become what it is today. Its first... Read More

History of Some Badass Boulder Women

April 17th, 2021

Revealing Our Routes: Women of Boulder County was originally developed by the Women of the West Museum back in 2002. Now the exhibit is now hosted by Boulder History Museum’s site. There are dozens of dynamic ladies documented in this collection, and today we’ve brought you a few of our favorites. Ruth Cave Flowers (1903-1980) was a native Boulderite who graduated from Boulder high in 1920. Because she was African-American they refused to award her a diploma featuring her catchy name. Despite her lack of diploma, CU accepted Ruth Flowers as a student. She earned a doctorate in Romance... Read More

7 Unknown and Fascinating Facts About Boulder

April 15th, 2021

Think you know everything there is to know about Boulder? See how many of these fun facts you already know! 1. Bicycling in Boulder is so popular that the Boulder Creek bike path is often plowed before the streets 2. Boulder’s Third Flatiron towers are taller than the Empire State Building and have been climbed by people without using their hands, on roller skates, and naked (by separate people) 3. Between Coors, Anheuser Busch, and Avery Brewing in Colorado, this area is the largest beer-producing triangle in the world 4. Boulder has more used bookstores per capita than any other city... Read More

Pearl Street’s Quick ‘N Dirty Backstory

April 14th, 2021

A Boulder resident in the 1940s remarked that Pearl street is “a good place to buy a pair of socks.” I think this adage holds true today, and that Pearl offers Boulder exponentially more to go along with those socks. Pearl Street is supposedly named for one of the wives of the original 54 founders of Boulder. However, I have also heard whispers that “Pearl” was a madam of a brothel once located near what is now Pearl Street. The first explanation is more likely, though I find the second more provocative and appealing. If I had to describe Pearl Street, I would say it’s an intermingling... Read More

Why Boulder is Truly the Best College Town in America

April 14th, 2021

BestCollegeReviews recently put up a list of the fifty best college towns in America, and the number one slot was saved for none other than Boulder, Colorado. Boulder is no stranger to being included in these “best of” lists for college towns, either. Previously, Travel and Leisure put Boulder as the sixth best college town on their list. AIER also previously listed Boulder as the best small metro college city. Livability also gave Boulder the number one spot for the best college town back in 2013. Really, anyone living in Boulder knows just how great it is. In case anyone has forgotten,... Read More

West Flanders Brewing Company : A Truly Intercontinental Tale

April 13th, 2021
West Flanders Brewing Company Boulder

At this point, I realize it’s rather passé, but I just have to talk about this month’s unusual weather one more time. Notably, the daily gloomy forecasts remind me very vividly of my time spent in the city of Amsterdam. As a young and impressionable collegian, I can’t imagine a better crash course in beer culture. Every day would greet us with thick fog, the occasional drizzle, only to be replaced with an onslaught of rain and grumpy attitudes. So, along with some of the other Americans on my study abroad semester, decided to seek out Amsterdam’s best bar for beer. While... Read More

Faces of Boulder – Pic of the Day!

April 12th, 2021

From the high mountains of the French Alps to the Flat Irons, Victoria is no stranger to massive rock formations. But ironically you wont find her on the mountain, instead you are more likely to find her in front of a camera or at your local theater. Victoria moved to Boulder three years ago to pursue acting at CU. She has since preformed in CU productions as well as a plethora of student films. She has built herself a quality reel since she came to the states, and her work ethic will only take her further. Be on the look out for her in a theater near you!  Read More

What Classifies a Craft Brew?

April 11th, 2021

“What makes a craft brew, a craft brew?” I innocently asked. The man looked at me, as if I were still in high school, barely old enough to drink a soda, let alone a beer. He replied, with a perplexed look on his face, “As long as you produce less beer than Sam Adams, you’re considered a craft brewery.” I thought to myself, “Seriously?” Now, I don’t recall where I was (it was one of those nights), but I was speaking to a Boulder beer aficionado, or so I thought. This idea of what classifies a craft brew slipped my mind, until a recent argument over... Read More

Biking Around Boulder: Finding Your Ideal Bike Path

April 11th, 2021

Boulder is known as one of America’s best bike-friendly cities, and with good reason. There are tons of paths for both road cycling as well as mountain biking, so there’s really something for everyone in Boulder. It can be hard to choose a good path, however, due to the sheer amount of options available. Luckily, in this particular blog post, I’ll point out a few of Boulder’s best bike routes. Boulder Creek Path Boulder Creek Path is one of Boulder’s most well-known walking and biking areas. Its 5.5 miles of beautiful scenery make it a very aesthetic ride, and its... Read More

Faces of Boulder – Pic of the Day!

April 9th, 2021

  From the precision of performing an autopsy to the precision of pouring the perfect cup of craft coffee, a former medical student traded in his scalpel for coffee beans. Meet Brice! Born and raised in Boulder, this Colorado native holds true to his roots and opened a craft coffee house in Louisville with the humbling and overwhelming support of friends, neighbors and locals. It’s with undeniable passion that Brice runs his business, “I wanted to create a safe and friendly environment for communities to gather,” and it is very apparent. Brice strives to educate customers with a vast... Read More

Boulder’s Terrifying Mascot from the 1980s!

April 9th, 2021

Meet “Buddy Boulder,” the mascot proving that even the gleaming citizens of Boulder sometimes make bad decisions. Or eerie ones at the very least. How was this grinning stone created? Well, in 1984 the Boulder Hotel and Motel Association had a “Mascot Mania” event whereby people were allowed to submit mascot ideas for the city of Boulder. The winners received cash prizes. You would think money would be incentive to create something inviting and recognizable. Sure, Buddy has the Flatirons on his head, but we just can’t stop looking at his cold, shifty, doll eyes. The... Read More

The Beginnings of Boulder

April 8th, 2021

The story of Boulder, Colorado begins roughly 300 million years ago when our iconic Flatirons formed the seabed of the ocean that covered the better part of the North American continent. This sea, the Western Interior Seaway, ate away at the sandstone beneath it until it began to resemble the shape of the Flatirons we all know and love. It was not until about 40 million years ago that the Flatirons shifted into their present position when the Rocky Mountains were created, becoming part of the “Fountain Formation.” This formation includes other spectacular Colorado landmarks including the Red... Read More

Chautauqua Park in Boulder Colorado

April 8th, 2021

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A Brief History of the Beer Boot

April 8th, 2021

Drinking beer is not the only thing I do, so the other day, I decided to go on a lovely jaunt through downtown Boulder. Where was I walking, do you ask? To the Bohemian Biergarten, of course! I was on a quest to discover the history behind the beloved beer boot, or Das Boot, as many of us fondly refer to it. I arrived at my destination, but to my disappointment, their Bavarian chef, Martin König, was away, and my question could not be answered. I actually think my curiosity may have sparked the same questioning surrounding Das Boot in others. Anyways, I am not the most patient person, so instead... Read More