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Tuesday - January 26, 2021

Articles Written By AndreaGroth

 

Soup IS Good Food

January 24th, 2021

Researchers think Tom Yum Gung, a zesty Thai soup, might have cancer-fighting ingredients as well as good taste. Also called hot and sour soup, Tom Yum Gung is a shrimp soup with herbal ingredients like coriander, lemon grass, lime leaves and even galangal roots, a pungent root similar to ginger. A recent joint study by Thailand’s Kasetsart University and Japan’s Kyoto and Kinki Universities has found that the ingredients in Tom Yum Gung soup are 100 times more effective in inhibiting cancerous tumor growth than other foods. Soup has long been thought to have health enhancing properties.... Read More

In A Clench? It’s Not Good For Your Teeth.

January 24th, 2021

If you ever wake up in the morning with a tight or sore jaw, fatigue, or sensitive teeth, you could be grinding or clenching your teeth at night.  The condition, known as bruxism, can lead to headaches and dental problems. Teeth grinding can be caused by stress and anxiety,  and it often occurs during sleep, caused by an abnormal bite or missing or crooked teeth. More importantly, bruxism can be caused by sleep apnea. Obstructive sleep apnea occurs when the throat muscles relax during the night, blocking the airway and interrupting breathing. About 25% of people with obstructive sleep apnea grind... Read More

Procrastination May Be Hardwired into Your Brain

January 23rd, 2021

Are you putting off until tomorrow what you could be doing today? If that’s you, it might not be just a personality trait. A study of over 250 men’s and women’s brain scans revealed that a brain region involved in motivation tends to be larger among people who put things off, while communication between that part of the brain and another involved in taking action appeared to be weaker. This study is the first to scan the brain to identify a neural basis for procrastination. Participants in the study were between the ages of 18 and 35 with no history of neurological or psychiatric disorders.... Read More

The Science of Hugging for Health

January 23rd, 2021

From birth to death, one of the most important parts of being human is the need for physical contact. Did you know that a firm hug can make you feel less negative emotion? Scientists found that getting a hug on the day of a conflict was linked to a slight rise in positive emotions and a comparable drop in negative ones, and appeared to linger into the following day. Evidence suggests that close physical contact — such as a hug — can play a part in reducing the risk of cardiovascular diseases, blood pressure, stress, loneliness, aggression, anxiety and depression. When you hug someone, you release... Read More

Four Reasons You Might Be Suffering from Congestion

January 22nd, 2021

Feeling a little stuffy?  Congestion is a common problem, as anyone who has had a cold or suffers from allergies can attest.  Congestion refers to a feeling of stuffiness in the nasal or breathing passageways. Nasal congestion, stuffiness, or a runny nose is generally caused by increased blood volume to the vessels that line the passages inside the nose. There are a number of causes of congestion that we all know: sinus infection, cold or flu, and allergies.  There are a few other reasons you may be snotty that fall into the category of “none of the above.” You might be able to breathe easier... Read More

Five Facts About Meat 2.0

January 20th, 2021

Since 2016, Meat 2.0 has become the trending food topic. Beyond Meat and Impossible Food are the two major plant-based meat companies now serving consumers at restaurants from A&W to White Castle, as well as in grocery stores. The rise in popularity is based on consumer’s desire to cut down on meat consumption. According to a survey conducted by Johns Hopkins University, nearly 60% of U.S. consumers have expressed interested in eating less meat, driving the market for alternative protein sources that taste like beef.  Why? Studies have shown a link between frequent consumption of red meat... Read More

Writing Things Down Is Better for Your Memory

January 10th, 2021

If you are of a certain age, you remember when computers were huge mainframes in the computer science lab, you took a typewriter to college, and you wrote notes by hand in class. Technology has presented us with many modern opportunities to take notes – laptops, tablets, phones, watches.  While we have many options at our disposal, science is proving that the best way to take notes for retaining knowledge is a good, old-fashioned paper and pen. Studies of memory retention using a variety of different tools for note taking show that note-taking by hand improves retention in almost all circumstances.... Read More

The Lazy Human’s Guide to Exercise

January 10th, 2021

Exercise can seem daunting, exhausting or downright impossible if you are busy…and who isn’t busy? Time and gym access are the two biggest excuses Americans cite for not working out.  Research conducted at McMaster University in Ontario, Canada, suggests that taking the stairs 30 minutes a week can give our body adequate exercise for good health. Stair climbing is a rigorous activity and previous research has found climbing stairs can burn calories two to three times faster than just walking. In the McMaster study, 17 healthy men, average age 64, were asked to walk, lift weights, and climb... Read More

Facts About Food That Can Influence Your Diet

January 9th, 2021
fruits and vegetables

Did you know that a green (unripe) banana confers its own unique health benefits? Green bananas are a good source of fiber, vitamins, and minerals, and contain resistant starch which cannot be broken down by enzymes in your digestive system and, therefore, acts more like fiber. Including foods high in resistant starch in your diet may reduce your risk of diabetes and heart disease by aiding in blood sugar control and lowering blood cholesterol levels. Bananas have higher levels of antioxidants as they ripen. Fully ripened bananas produce a substance called Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF). TNF regulates... Read More

Can Sleeping In Improve Your Health?

January 8th, 2021
Napping

New research suggests people who get too little sleep during the week can make up for it on the weekends. According to a study published in the Journal of Sleep Research, people who slept less than five hours each night throughout the week had an increased risk of early death compared to those who slept six to seven hours every night. People who get less than five hours during the week, but who catch up on some of that lost sleep on the weekend, do not have the same risk. These results suggest that sleep is not a risk factor for mortality if it is combined with a medium or long weekend sleep. Some... Read More

Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants.

January 8th, 2021

Recently, a friend of mine posted on social media that he was considering a plant-based diet to reduce his risk of heart disease.  What does that means for those of us who are omnivores – eaters of food that are of both plant and animal origin? Is it necessary to eschew animal protein to have a healthy heart? Michael Pollan, author of The Omnivore’s Dilemma and Food Rules: An Eater’s Manual, among others, has been an outspoken critic of both America’s obsession with healthy eating and American food policy.  In 2009, Mr. Pollan spoke to a room full of CDC scientists about how and why... Read More

Biosensors Could Make Staying Healthy a Little Easier

January 6th, 2021

If you look closely at a Gatorade commercial featuring Serena Williams called “You Fuel Us, We’ll Fuel You,” you may have noticed she is wearing a small patch.  That patch is a biosensor being used as a health monitor—in this case, by assessing sweat. Biosensors are currently being tested in athletes, but have other applications in the world of health. The sensor itself is a soft, flexible patch that adheres to the skin and is placed directly on the forearm or back. It’s a little larger than a quarter and about the same thickness. Fluids can be collected non-invasively and many... Read More

Trust But Verify Your Fitness Facts

January 2nd, 2021

I hear, read and see lots of material on health and well-being.  Sometimes the information is thorough and accurate.  Sometimes the information is correct, but some facts are omitted. Here are a few things I still hear after many years in the fitness business. BMI is not a valid health measure.  Body Mass Index, or BMI, is a measure of body fat based on height and weight that applies to adult men and women. Some complain that this not a valid way to determine if someone is fat or not.  The fact is, most Americans can use BMI to determine if they are overweight or obese, but for some this method... Read More

The Trifecta of Success

January 1st, 2021

We all know that it’s important to eat well, be physically active and get a good night’s sleep.  In recent years, magazines such as Entrepreneur, Time and Inc. have featured articles about the connection between engaging in the trifecta of health behaviors and professional success. Why? Your success starts with your health – eating healthy, getting enough sleep, and exercising regularly. After all, if don’t feel great, how do you expect to sustain the focus and energy needed to get things done? Here’s a closer look at why food, sleep, and exercise can impact your success and what... Read More

The Gummy Bear Diet

December 22nd, 2020

I was recently talking to someone close to me who is participating in a weight loss challenge at work.  The company hired a personal trainer to give each participant a plan to follow.  Apparently, there were some participants who didn’t like the calorie count of their food plan.  They were certain they needed only 1200 calories per day and the trainer had recommended 1400-1600 depending on whom you ask. Let me oversimplify dieting for just a minute by summarizing some basic principles of dieting. All diets work. If you eat few enough calories, you can be on the Gummy Bear Diet and will... Read More

The Loss of Everything You Know

December 14th, 2020

My mother has dementia. When I talk to her it is like talking to a pre-school age child — stream of consciousness-style ramblings of reality mixed with fantasy. It is disturbing to compare this woman to the person my mother was before dementia.  She was smart, witty, and quite opinionated.  She was a modern woman who was still quite old-fashioned; a unique woman for her generation. Dementia is not a disease, but rather a group of symptoms caused by other conditions.  Dementia causes problems with thinking, memory, and reasoning, happening when the parts of the brain used for learning,... Read More

Are You Optimizing Your Health?

December 13th, 2020

There is widespread agreement among those in the scientific and health care communities, that certain behaviors contribute greatly to preventable chronic disease, improve productivity and impact health. In 2000, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimated that four lifestyle-related behavioral risk factors accounted for approximately 40% of all deaths in the United States. The optimal lifestyle metric (OLM), reflects adherence to these four positive health behaviors: not using tobacco, exercising at least 150 minutes per week, consuming at least five fruits and vegetable... Read More

4 Tips for Comfortable Cohabitation

November 30th, 2020

According to the 2010 census data, 15 million people live together without being married, a 138% increase since 1990. According to the Pew Research Center, 18 million adults were living with an unmarried partner in 2016. With more people moving in without putting a ring on it, it makes sense to talk about what happens when you move in and what you should plan before you move in. Moving in together is a big change! Now you’ll see one another all the time, and find out about all of your partner’s warts.  Before you cohabitate with your significant other, here are a few things to think about. Make... Read More

Move Over Kale, Sea Greens Are the New Super Food

November 29th, 2020

Sea greens, also known as sea vegetables, are a group of foods in the seaweed family, that grow in the ocean. If you eat Japanese food you may be familiar with some sea greens – nori, the dark green wrapper on your sushi, or kombu, a common ingredient in miso soup. If you think you’ve never had seaweed, think again! Agar, a gelatinous substance that comes from red seaweed is used as a thickener in many foods. Sea vegetables are some of the most nutrient-packed foods on earth, packed with fiber vitamins and minerals. They are beneficial to us because they slow the aging process by promoting... Read More

What’s Better for Weight Loss – Diet or Exercise?

November 20th, 2020

  “Eat less, move more” is a mantra I’ve heard and advice I’ve given many times over the years.  While both calorie intake and physical activity are important factors in weight loss, which one is more important? Physiologically speaking, weight loss and gain revolve around the concept of calories in, calories out. In a nutshell, we lose weight when we eat fewer calories than we expend. Conversely, we gain weight when we eat more calories than we expend. Many of us have been advised to add physical activity to our weight loss plan to increase our calorie burn and improve... Read More