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Thursday - April 9, 2020

Archive for the ‘ History of Boulder ’ Category

 

Complex Origins of Boulder’s Fox Theatre

April 6th, 2020

The grand red sign and huge white marquee of Boulder’s Fox Theatre give the building a sense of purpose and permanence. This strong identity boldly contrasts the complex and confusing history of the building itself. This nearly 90 year old space has housed vaudeville acts, a cafe, and a other interesting things in between. The building sitting at 1135 13th Street on The Hill was constructed in 1926 by Adrian G. Diez, but was first owned a Mr. William Beach. Beach sold the building to Diez in 1926, and the building changed hands no less than 8 times to become what it is today. Its first... Read More

Are the Boulder Flatirons Remnants of Ancient Beaches?

March 20th, 2020

You will learn how Boulder’s iconic Flatirons formed. Turns out, Boulder was once beachfront property. The Flatirons are Boulder’s favorite portion of the Fountain Formation, a geological formation of mostly red sandstone. This sandstone, more appropriately called “arkose” gets its color from the pinkish feldspar contained it it. This red rock makes up the Red Rocks of Morrison and the Garden of the Gods in Colorado Springs. The Fountain Formation stretches from Colorado Springs all the way to Wyoming. The reddish color is due to the concentration of feldspar in the sandstone,... Read More

Girl Power!!! The History of Women in Boulder

March 18th, 2020

In a recent study in Boulder, it was found that the city is leading the nation on gender equity. Currently, the national average for women’s wages are 84% of what men make. In Boulder the average is 88%. Boulder is obviously a special city, leading the nation in multiple avenues from preventative measures for climate change to progressive gender equality. This got me thinking about famous women in Boulder and the steps they have taken to catalyze change in their city and nation. If you were lucky enough to visit the Pioneers: Women Artists in Boulder exhibit last year at the Art Museum at... Read More

Where was Boulder’s Dushanbe Teahouse Made?

March 18th, 2020

One of the most common pieces of advice a Boulderite will give to a new resident is “Go check out the Dushanbe Teahouse,” but what’s so special about a teahouse? Well, ours was handcrafted in Tajikistan during the Cold War, and kindly shipped by our sister city of Dushanbe. The rebuilding of the teahouse in Boulder was an awesome accomplishment which nearly did not happen. The idea of a sister city or twin town developed from the Cold War following WWII. The point was to form legal and social bonds between disparate cultures, and even promote relationships between former enemies.... Read More

5 Boulder Musicians You Should Know

March 16th, 2020

Josephine Antoine This fair Boulderite was beloved for her incredible rise to fame as a Metropolitan Opera star. After completing her education in Boulder, Antoine went on to earn a Master’s at the Julliard School of Music in NYC. Before her first national appearance, she received a telegram from the mayor of Boulder reading: “Every citizen sends you love and good wishes for your performance tomorrow.” She was a success, and sang the lead in 14 Metropolitan Opera productions. Her singing was featured on national radio stations, and she returned to Boulder to perform at the Colorado... Read More

The Beginnings of Boulder

March 9th, 2020

The story of Boulder, Colorado begins roughly 300 million years ago when our iconic Flatirons formed the seabed of the ocean that covered the better part of the North American continent. This sea, the Western Interior Seaway, ate away at the sandstone beneath it until it began to resemble the shape of the Flatirons we all know and love. It was not until about 40 million years ago that the Flatirons shifted into their present position when the Rocky Mountains were created, becoming part of the “Fountain Formation.” This formation includes other spectacular Colorado landmarks including the Red... Read More

6 Famous Boulderites You Should Know

February 27th, 2020

We can’t say for sure if being in Boulder makes you a better or more successful person, but these celebrities from our fair city lend some credibility to the notion. And since we aren’t a gossip site, these won’t all be film and TV stars. We are showing you real people from Boulder who did, and are doing, interesting and popular things with their lives. 3OH!3 Sean Foreman and Nathaniel Motte make up the electronica group 3OH!3, which received national success with their song “Don’t Trust Me”. They gained even more attention when they collaborated with Ke$ha... Read More

A Brief History of CU Boulder

February 23rd, 2020

Boulder’s first schoolhouse opened in 1860, but it was far from the last school to be built here! The University of Colorado in Boulder was established in the early 1870s when the Colorado territorial legislature made an amendment to the constitution that provided money for three universities. CU was, of course, one. The other two were the Colorado School of Mines in Golden and the Colorado Agricultural College in Fort Collins, both of which still exist today. But at first, there was some debate about exactly where to put the new university. Two cities were competing for it: Boulder and Cañon... Read More

Taking a Stand! History of Protests in Boulder

January 10th, 2018

Boulder has been known for quite some time for being the ‘cradle of the hippie’, known for its dedication to nature and the environment, liberal ideologies, and a place for both artists and intellectuals to gather in a friendly, local space. In light of the recent holiday, and some of the protests we have seen around town, I thought it would be interesting to take a trip through history and remember some of the past protests in Boulder that has helped shape the city. In the 1950’s the Rocky Flat Plant was established in Denver, CO to manufacture and produce nuclear weapons during the Cold... Read More

What to do When Boulder’s Sirens Call

January 6th, 2018

As you may have heard, Boulder County’s most recent emergency warning systems test was Monday evening. Boulder’s flood season stretches from April through August, and that means the emergency warning systems need to be tested regularly. Flash floods are no joke, but neither are the 30+ sirens of Boulder County’s outdoor warning system. Following World War II most cities and towns in the United States incorporated siren alarm systems for civil defense. These were originally intended to warn civilians of impending air raids, hence the colloquial term “air raid sirens”.... Read More

CU’s Ice History

July 13th, 2017

In the news yesterday, a UK based research team reported that a massive iceberg weighing more than one trillion tons broke off from western Antarctica. It is bigger than the state of Delaware, and surprisingly (and thankfully) scientists do not believe it will impact sea levels or coastal regions. The ice shelf was already floating before it broke off and therefore there will be no water displacement or sea level rise. Recently, students and professors at the University of Colorado, Boulder have been studying the effects of black carbon on ice and snow in ecosystems around the world. Black carbon... Read More

Be Bold, Be Boulder

May 25th, 2017

If you’re a running enthusiast in Boulder County you’ve probably heard about the Bolder Boulder 10k run. It’s the third largest road race in the United States and was recently named the best 10K by Runner’s World. There’s usually thousands of spectators, thousands of runners, random entertainment like slip n’ slides and music, outrageous running costumes, and it all starts this Monday on May 29th. The race first started in 1979 as a Memorial Day Tribute that still continues today. The fastest time for the 6.2 mile race occurred in 1995, with a man named Josephat Machuka, who ran it... Read More

What’s in a name?

May 11th, 2017

Boulder is a pretty interesting name for a city, don’t you think? Both a pronoun and a noun gives it a fairly unique affect. I was thinking about the reasoning behind of the name of the city, deducing (incorrectly) that it must have been named for some of the world class bouldering found around the Flatirons and in the surrounding area. But after some digging, I discovered that it was thought to be named after Boulder Creek, the thirty-mile creek flowing through downtown and outwards from the Rocky Mountains. There is no real consensus on this matter however, and very little information on the... Read More

It’s a bird! It’s a plane! It’s Super Drone!

May 4th, 2017

Boulder is once again putting its name on the map with a local drone engineering company that has just signed on with NASA. The company, named Black Swift, has just signed a $875,000 contract to monitor temperatures, winds, and gases at volcano sites, the data which will be used to better predict ash and other dangerous emissions that are propelled into the atmosphere. The Black Swift drones have already tested their stuff against fires, floods, and tornadoes, and now they are looking to conquer their next adversary. The Black Swift company was started by Jack Elston and Maciej Stachura, two Aerospace... Read More

Reduce, Reuse, Recycle!

April 27th, 2017

Last weekend was Earth Day, and Boulder citizens made their zeal for the environment and sustainability known with hikes and conferences downtown, kid’s activities in the park, and films at the Fiske Planetarium at the University of Colorado. Boulder is an exceptionally environmentally conscious town and I thought it would be interesting to look at the history of Earth day and what Boulder citizens have done to help and protect the environment. The first Earth Day occurred in 1970, and was started by then Senator of Wisconsin, Gaylord Nelson. After seeing a massive oil spill in Santa Barbara... Read More

Junius Henderson — The “Giant” of Natural History

April 20th, 2017

The Natural History Museum at the University of Colorado Boulder is a pretty fantastic place. It holds the largest collection of historical artifacts in the Rocky Mountains, possesses over four million objects, and has a diverse array of exhibits that would pique anyone’s historical interest. For the next few months, alongside the dinosaur bones and other permanent exhibits, the Natural History Museum will feature ‘Becoming Butterflies’, an exhibit which features the entire life cycle of a butterfly from chrysalis to winged beauty. It will also feature ‘Animals in Antiquity’, an exhibit... Read More

The CWA– The Conference on Everything Conceivable

April 13th, 2017

This week in Boulder, from April 10th-14th, the University of Colorado hosts the CWA or the Conference for World Affairs. It is a week-long gathering featuring lectures from prominent leaders across the world, including keynote speaker David Newman– NASA’s deputy administer, NFL Player Chris Borland, and Debra Eschemeyer, former Policy Advisor for Michelle Obama’s nutritional project, Let’s Move! The CWA is a veritable cornucopia of intelligent, ambitious minds lecturing on their successes and it’s been a fascinating experience listening in on different series. One lecture I attended... Read More

From Canvas to Streets– Street Art in Boulder

March 30th, 2017

Recently, walking around Boulder and taking in the sites, I’ve noticed an ample amount of street art, most notably drawn/painted/stenciled by SMiLE, an anonymous Boulder artist. SMiLE’s repertoire ranges from portraits of Jack Kerouac and Brad Pitt, to a menagerie of animals, most especially cats. A little less than a year ago SMiLE had an exhibition in Boulder titled ‘Streets to Canvas’, and made a profound statement on the website promoting the event. SMiLE states, “Art has always been in the vanguard of the worlds changing consciousness, and Street Art is the contemporary form of this... Read More

Coffee Nation

March 16th, 2017

Coffee; the sweet, dark ambrosia that keeps us going throughout the day. In recent years, coffee has become a phenomenon that has seen the proliferation of Starbucks on seemingly every busy street corner, and Boulder has been no exception. However, luckily enough, Boulder possesses it’s more eclectic, independent coffee shops that have proven to be more popular hotspots for locals.           First, a brief history of coffee: Coffee drinking is thought to date back to the 15th Century in Ethiopia. Legend goes that a healer was exiled from his city and sent to live in... Read More

Pitch, Yaw, and Roll– The Crazy Jargon of Virtual Reality

March 9th, 2017

      Last week’s blog on the history of movies filmed in Colorado got me thinking about the evolution of television: how we went from theater and plays, to black and white silent shows, to full blown color and sound effects. Now, we have entered a new era of virtual reality and augmented reality, whereupon putting on some over-sized goggles allows us to be fully immersed in a movie or game, becoming actively part of the films we used to passively watch. How VR works Virtual Reality’s goal is total immersion—to trick your brain into believing that what you are seeing is real. Different... Read More