After several reports have come out this week against Juul and the unknown, potentially very harmful effects of vaping, Boulder officials have decided to move forward with the ban on electronic cigarettes with flavored nicotine.

Under the new law, tobacco flavored electronic cigarettes will still be allowed.

This comes after U.S. health officials released a statement that they were investigating 215 cases of severe lung disease that are associated with vaping, with the investigation looking at both THC and nicotine related vaping products. In a statement, the CDC and the FDA said, “We’re on the cusp of what we consider new territory in that this is not an illness or an association between vaping and acute respiratory illnesses that have been reported before or that CDC even collects information on.”

Juul CEO Kevin Burns also made a statement regarding vaping and his products earlier this week, saying, “Don’t start using nicotine if you don’t have a preexisting relationship with nicotine. Don’t use the product. You’re not our target consumer.”

Vaping has long been toted as a safer and healthier alternative to smoking, but it seems this may not be the case.

Boulder City Council has also agreed to move forward with raising the minimum purchasing age for all tobacco and nicotine products to 21 instead of 18.

This plan also moves forward with the urging of a new law on the November ballot to approve a 40% tax on all e-cigarette purchases.

Kaylee was raised (but not *technically* born) in Colorado. She graduated from Regis University with a bachelor of arts in English. During her time at Regis she worked as a teaching assistant in a freshman classroom setting and in the writing center helping students on a variety of topics. While there, she discovered Cura Personalis, or care for the entire person, leading to her love of feminism and desire for equal rights for all. Kaylee is the managing editor for AboutBoulder, OnDenver, and a key member of the OnMetro team, launching this platform in cities across the United States.