1. Royal Arch Trail

Royal Arch Trail is a popular 4 mile trail in Chautauqua park. To get to the trail, you’ll start on Chautauqua Trail and continue until the trails branch off. Follow signs for Royal Arch Trail–you’ll know you’ve started on the right one when you hit the flagstone staircase. This trail is good for hiking and running, and also allows leashed dogs.

2. Chapman Road and Tenderfoot Trail

This is a great, easy 2.5 mile loop. Chapman Road is relatively uncovered, so be sure to bring sunscreen, while Tenderfoot Trail is more shaded. If you start the trail at Boulder Canyon Drive there will be less traffic, but there is more of an uphill hike at the beginning. This trail is best for hiking and running, and birdwatchers will get a great view as well.

3. Mount Sanitas Peak Trail

This 2.6 mile out and back is an extension of the very popular Mt. Sanitas & Sanitas Valley Loop. This trail has a faster hike to the summit than the other trails have and offers rock scrambling (if desired), a steady ascent, projected outcrops, and a “desert-like” baked earth terrain. Dogs are allowed on-leash.

4. Shanahan Ridge Trail

Shanahan Ridge Trail is a 3.7 mile loop that can be adjusted in length and time as there are many forks that can take you on various versions of the trail. There’s a moderate ascent throughout the trail, but should still be manageable even for a novice hiker. The trail is dog friendly so long as they are leashed.

5. Mallory Cave

While the cave itself is closed to prevent the disturbance of the bats living there, this hike will take you to the mouth of the cave in different ways depending on the season. The winter months, generally November to March, allow for bouldering and rock climbing routes that are closed in the summer months.

6. Bear Peak Trail

Bear Peak Trail is a long but relatively easy hike, with the last mile or so before the summit becoming more challenging. There are beautiful 360 views of Boulder at the summit, but since it is fairly icy you will likely need spikes to complete the trail at the summit.

7. First and Second Flatiron Loop

This loop is popular for even novice hikers, but there are plenty of places to go off road and scramble and explore some more rugged terrain. This loop stays very icy through until the middle of summer, so it’s best if you get spikes–you can rent in town for as little as $5 if you don’t already have a pair.

Kaylee was raised (but not *technically* born) in Colorado. She graduated from Regis University with a bachelor of arts in English. During her time at Regis she worked as a teaching assistant in a freshman classroom setting and in the writing center helping students on a variety of topics. While there, she discovered Cura Personalis, or care for the entire person, leading to her love of feminism and desire for equal rights for all. Kaylee is the managing editor for AboutBoulder, OnDenver, and a key member of the OnMetro team, launching this platform in cities across the United States.