Quantcast
   
Sunday - March 3, 2024

Posts Tagged With ‘ history ’

 

What the Heck is a Chautauqua?

February 10th, 2024

Every Boulderite knows that Chautauqua is up on 900 Baseline Road in Boulder, but how did it get there? And what is a Chautauqua anyway? The Chautauqua movement of the late 19th century was an effort to educate rural communities who lacked access to the mass culture being developed in cities. The movement lasted from the 1870s all the way into the 1920s. Rural peoples were hungry for entrainment and brain food, but lacked a way to easily travel because automobiles weren’t widely available until 1910. The “Mother Chautauqua” (which sounds a bit like a spaceship name to me) was... Read More

Why Does Boulder Have A “Greenbelt”?

February 9th, 2024

You may hear Boulderites referring to a “greenbelt,” but what is that and why does Boulder have one? There was huge population growth in Boulder between 1950 and 1970. This growth was due to the presence of the University of Colorado, the intellectual diversity surrounding the university, and a strong local economy. At an annual growth rate of about 6%, the population of the city was set to double every 11 years or so. Being all about sustainability and preserving local culture, the citizens of Boulder took action against the human tsunami threatening to wash out the city. In 1967... Read More

The University of Colorado’s Early History

February 5th, 2024

Before Thomas Jefferson signed the Louisiana Purchase in 1803, and before Colorado became a state in 1876, the area was settled by numerous Native American tribes, predominantly inhabited by the Arapaho. The Arapaho were successful nomadic hunters, expanding their presence through trade, warfare, and alliances with other tribes. They were closely allied with the Cheyenne, which allowed their hunting territory to expand greatly and made them a formidable force. Much of their culture revolved around the idea of a warrior, which included not only skills in combat, but also in keeping peace, and in... Read More

A Brief History of Some Incredible Boulder Women

February 2nd, 2024

Revealing Our Routes: Women of Boulder County was originally developed by the Women of the West Museum back in 2002. Now the exhibit is now hosted by Boulder History Museum’s site. There are dozens of dynamic ladies documented in this collection, and today we’ve brought you a few of our favorites. Ruth Cave Flowers (1903-1980) was a native Boulderite who graduated from Boulder high in 1920. Because she was African-American they refused to award her a diploma featuring her catchy name. Despite her lack of diploma, CU accepted Ruth Flowers as a student. She earned a doctorate in Romance... Read More

Lights, Camera, Action! – The history of movies filmed in Colorado

February 1st, 2024

To start off with, I want to look back on some of the famous movies that have been filmed right here in Boulder and in some of our close neighboring cities. Perhaps the most famous recent film shot in Colorado was “The Hateful Eight”, Tarantino’s latest film which featured a bounty hunter and his prisoner seeking shelter in a cabin inhabited by some nefarious criminals. The film is bloody, funny, and excellently written, and located not too far from Boulder in Telluride, CO. Tarantino put out feelers in Utah and Wyoming, before settling on the Colorado location. Tarantino wanted a mountain... Read More

History of Skiing in Boulder & Chautauqua Park

January 31st, 2024

When the days get cold, it’s hard not to turn your attention to the weather. And when it comes to fall and winter that means snow. Come on: more than a few of us live in Colorado for that very reason. Where there’s snow, of course, there’s skiing, snowboarding, and a host of other activities. That probably brings to mind the big Summit County resorts—your Beavercreeks and Breckenridges and Keystones. Closer to town, there’s the always scrappy Eldora; while their snow tends not to be as deep, their territory not as expansive as the mega resorts, they make up for it in coziness. And better... Read More

Boulderite Top USA Travel Destinations

January 30th, 2024

Why would someone who already lives in Boulder travel anywhere else? The answer is easy. Because we can! So where should we go? Here are seven top travel destinations for those who call Boulder “home.” Will everyone appeal to everybody? Of course! OK, so not really. BUT these ideas are certain to contain a number of destinations that might not have been on your radar and now can be moved from “off the list” to “top of the list.” For Boulderites looking to travel in 2024, there are seven domestic destinations plus a bonus to consider: Orlando, Florida: A classic... Read More

Are the Boulder Flatirons Remnants of Ancient Beaches?

January 29th, 2024

You will learn how Boulder’s iconic Flatirons formed. Turns out, Boulder was once beachfront property. The Flatirons are Boulder’s favorite portion of the Fountain Formation, a geological formation of mostly red sandstone. This sandstone, more appropriately called “arkose” gets its color from the pinkish feldspar contained it it. This red rock makes up the Red Rocks of Morrison and the Garden of the Gods in Colorado Springs. The Fountain Formation stretches from Colorado Springs all the way to Wyoming. The reddish color is due to the concentration of feldspar in the sandstone,... Read More

Timeless Pieces of Boulder’s Architectural History

January 22nd, 2024

With the holidays over, we figured we should refresh our minds with something different today. Boulder has a very interesting architectural history, especially the university campus. We will touch on some defining Boulder architectural projects which you have probably seen around town. Next time you’re out and about, maybe you’ll encounter some of these oh-so-Boulder building projects. The University Campus Of course we cannot skim Boulder’s architectural past without bringing up the University of Colorado campus. It began with the all-brick Old Main and soon grew into several... Read More

Boulder’s Great Flood of 1894

January 13th, 2024

After the flood that took place in the fall of 2013, most Boulder residents are sadly acquainted with the destructive power of rain and the Boulder Creek–normally a source of pleasure and entertainment. Many believe we had suffered from a 100 year flood when over nine inches of rain fell in the Boulder County area that September. Misleadingly, a “100 year flood” is not an event that takes place once every 100 years, but one that has only a 1% chance of occurring each year. But this was not the first time Boulder had experienced a disaster of this scope. Between May 31st and... Read More

Boulder’s Blissful Bubble: A Reflection on Parents and Worry-Free Living

January 10th, 2024
Lensworth & DALLE

  Grandma Ann Frieling, Lenny Lensworth Frieling “What, Me Worry?”           Alfred E. Newman In our magical Valley of Boulder, home to the Buffs, and to the rest of the best, I found myself in the hot tub, on a perfect day, with perfect music on the bluetooth, playing a great song. I literally did not have a care in the world. I caught myself wondering. “What am I forgetting to worry about?” I swear! I was worry about what I might have forgotten to worry about! I burst out laughing, cursed my mother with a smile, and went back to the music. My point is that... Read More

Complex Origins of Boulder’s Fox Theatre

January 7th, 2024

The grand red sign and huge white marquee of Boulder’s Fox Theatre give the building a sense of purpose and permanence. This strong identity boldly contrasts the complex and confusing history of the building itself. This nearly 90 year old space has housed vaudeville acts, a cafe, and a other interesting things in between. The building sitting at 1135 13th Street on The Hill was constructed in 1926 by Adrian G. Diez, but was first owned a Mr. William Beach. Beach sold the building to Diez in 1926, and the building changed hands no less than 8 times to become what it is today. Its first... Read More

A Brief, Chaotic History of the Flagstaff Star

December 24th, 2023

Imagine, getting back from a long day in Denver. It’s cold, it’s dark, and there’s some minor evening traffic. Then, you ascend the final hill towards Boulder, and you’re greeted by the bright shape of a star on the mountains. That’s the moment I wait for every November. During Veteran’s Day last week, the star began its annual winter residency in Boulder. The star is an important symbol, and no Boulder winter is complete without the giant glowing shape on Flagstaff Mountain. It provides a little extra light in a season when days are shorter and nights... Read More

Why Name a Lady Buffalo “Ralphie”?

December 7th, 2023

This title question, and the more general “Why a buffalo for a mascot?” answered below. Time to brush up on Buff history. Ralphie is the female buffalo mascot for CU Boulder. But why does this female buffalo sport a male name? And why did CU choose a bison mascot in the first place? The tradition began in 1934 when the university newspaper selected “Buffaloes” as the nickname for the university students. Three weeks later, a few students paid a rancher $25 to rent a bison calf and a cowboy to handle her. The calf had to be managed by all 4 students plus the ranch hand... Read More

Taking a Stand! History of Protests in Boulder

December 6th, 2023

Boulder has been known for quite some time for being the ‘cradle of the hippie’, known for its dedication to nature and the environment, liberal ideologies, and a place for both artists and intellectuals to gather in a friendly, local space. In light of the recent holiday, and some of the protests we have seen around town, I thought it would be interesting to take a trip through history and remember some of the past protests in Boulder that has helped shape the city. In the 1950’s the Rocky Flat Plant was established in Denver, CO to manufacture and produce nuclear weapons during the Cold... Read More

5 Boulder Musicians You Should Know

November 26th, 2023

Josephine Antoine This fair Boulderite was beloved for her incredible rise to fame as a Metropolitan Opera star. After completing her education in Boulder, Antoine went on to earn a Master’s at the Julliard School of Music in NYC. Before her first national appearance, she received a telegram from the mayor of Boulder reading: “Every citizen sends you love and good wishes for your performance tomorrow.” She was a success, and sang the lead in 14 Metropolitan Opera productions. Her singing was featured on national radio stations, and she returned to Boulder to perform at the Colorado... Read More

Bouldering in Boulder?? — You know it’s gotta be good

November 25th, 2023

The history of rock climbing and bouldering had its genesis with mountaineering and alpinism in the late 18th century, although climbing rocks had been a feat accomplished long before. In the 14th century, a Native American tribe called the Anasazi drilled holes and carved stairs into rock cliffs in Chaco Canyon, but it wasn’t until 1786 with the first ascent of Mont Blanc, that the ‘modern era’ of climbing truly came into being. The history of Boulder’s rock climbing and bouldering history began a little over one hundred years later in 1896 when a group of Boulder Hikers formed the Rocky... Read More

Explaining Boulder County’s Name and Shape

November 18th, 2023

Most of the West was divided up into straight-edged, boxy regions and subdivisions (take a look at poor Yuma County). Boulder County escapes the purely rectangular form of other counties in Colorado, and today we will tell you why. Plus, we will tell you why it’s named Boulder (but we bet you can guess). The need for Colorado to become a territory coincided with the secession of several southern states from the Union in 1861. Colorado applied for statehood that year, and offered the Union secure access to precious mineral deposits. Boulder County was one of the original 17 counties of... Read More

The Once and Future Architect of Boulder

November 1st, 2023

There is an argument to be made that architects don’t get their due. For every household name, such as Frank Lloyd Wright, there are thousands of people who spend their careers under the radar. Yet even lesser known architects literally and figuratively shape people’s lives by influencing the built environment in which they take place. Charles Haertling is a perfect example of such. His name is one many won’t recognize, but over the course of his life he left an indelible mark on our region. Born on October 21, 1928 in St. Genevieve, Missouri, Haertling joined the Navy in 1946, straight out... Read More

Boulder’s Haunted Getaway: Unmasking Colorado’s Second Most Haunted Hotel

October 23rd, 2023

A typical night in a typical haunted hotel begins with a gorgeous moon for atmosphere. As the sun sets on the horizon, the shadows of the famous Haunted Castle near Boulder grow longer and darker. This is also the second most haunted hotel in Colorado. For years, locals have whispered tales of paranormal activity within its walls, but no one has ever been brave enough to venture inside and uncover the truth. Until now. Join us as we take an intrepid adventure into the unknown, and uncover the mystery of the Haunted Castle near Boulder in this first-hand account of our investigation into the paranormal. Exploring... Read More