low angle photo of starry night

Photo by guille pozzi on Unsplash

While the holidays are an enjoyable time for many, the same cannot necessarily be said for students. This time of year, for many a student, is filled to the brim with the stress of finals. However, as finals season comes to a close, there are a variety of ways for students to become immersed in the life at CU Boulder again. For those students who may be staying around the college after finals, there are a variety of activities to participate in. A favorite place of mine on campus is the Fiske Planetarium. Fiske is so fabulous that some people who have never been to the CU Boulder campus will come to participate in the shows there. This is indeed a testament to how amazing Fiske truly is. For a student looking to unwind after finals, taking a trip to Fiske Planetarium might be the perfect remedy.

“Season of Light” show at Fiske Planetarium

This show at Fiske Planetarium focuses primarily on the holiday lights which brighten the dark winter sky. However, this show is not only concerned with being pretty, it also examines the traditions of holiday-centric lights. Beyond the examinations of holiday lights and their meanings, this show analyzes other holiday traditions beyond that of the Christian centric viewpoint. Fiske takes pride in the fact that it focuses on “Not only Christian and Jewish, but also Celtic, Nordic, Roman, Irish, Mexican and Hopi,” traditions, as is stated on the official calendar for CU Boulder events. No matter the religion or spirituality, or lack of one, that a person practices, there is something to be learned from “Seasons of Light.” This might be the perfect way to take a student’s mind off of finals and onto the joy and beauty of the holiday season.

“Colorado Skies Celebrate the Winter Solstice” show at Fisk Planetarium

silhouette of five persons staring at the stars at nigh

Photo by Hamid Khaleghi on Unsplash

If “Seasons of Light” is not quite your cup of tea, then this show might be more up your alley. “Colorado Skies Celebrate the Winter Solstice” focuses more on the traditional elements that one might expect from a planetarium show. This show has much more to do with the position of the stars at this point in the season. As is boasted on the CU Boulder events calendar, Fiske states that, “In this seasonal talk series, we explore the stars, planets, constellations, and deep-

sky objects such as galaxies and nebulae using our analog star projector, which produces a stunning night sky with 10 million stars.” This show focuses less on the “holiday” elements at this time of the year, and examines the beautiful Colorado night sky in depth.

red and yellow star ornament lot

Photo by Plush Design Studio on Unsplash

Fiske is magical especially for students like myself because it takes one out of our grade-consumed everyday existence and reminds us that there is a universe beyond college. Unlike what some of our professors will tell us, life does not begin and end with CU Boulder. Taking a trip to Fisk Planetarium can make us realize that the universe is a massive, beautiful place. As finals come to a close this next week, Fiske helps us students to feel that sense of the sublime which we may lose in the horrendous stress which culminates in finals season. Yet, this does not apply only to students. Everyday life can make all of us forget how magical the universe is. Fiske Planetarium offers something for everyone. So, for all my peers as well as anyone else who may need a reminder from the universe, Fiske Planetarium is a fabulous way to remember those stars which constantly live right over our heads, but which we may sometimes forget, as they are outshined by the sun.

Taylor Denton is a movie-loving, vegetarian, nerdy student living in Boulder, currently working to complete a degree in English. She was born on March 22nd, 1998, in Springfield, Missouri. She began writing short stories when she was in middle-school, publishing her first poem in a book created by her school. In high school, her love for creative writing expanded and came to life. She has continued to write, which has become her passion in life. She now writes in college from the perspective of a student, working as often as she can to keep her voice active and evolving while she continues to purse her enthusiasm for writing.