Saturday, February 24, 2018

Articles Written By TheresaDuncan

Taking a Stand! History of Protests in Boulder

January 10th, 2018

Boulder has been known for quite some time for being the ‘cradle of the hippie’, known for its dedication to nature and the environment, liberal ideologies, and a place for both artists and intellectuals to gather in a friendly, local space. In light of the recent holiday, and some of the protests we have seen around town, I thought it would be interesting to take a trip through history and remember some of the past protests in Boulder that has helped shape the city. In the 1950’s the Rocky Flat Plant was established in Denver, CO to manufacture and produce nuclear weapons during the Cold... Read More

CU’s Ice History

July 13th, 2017

In the news yesterday, a UK based research team reported that a massive iceberg weighing more than one trillion tons broke off from western Antarctica. It is bigger than the state of Delaware, and surprisingly (and thankfully) scientists do not believe it will impact sea levels or coastal regions. The ice shelf was already floating before it broke off and therefore there will be no water displacement or sea level rise. Recently, students and professors at the University of Colorado, Boulder have been studying the effects of black carbon on ice and snow in ecosystems around the world. Black carbon... Read More

Calling all bookworms, book hoarders, and bibliophiles!

June 15th, 2017

I admit: I am an avid bookworm, book hoarder, and bibliophile. I never go anywhere without a book and I must read at least an hour each day to feel slightly normal. I frequently visit Trident Booksellers, a three-story bookstore located in the heart of Pearl Street, and romp through their aisles, enjoying being around people who (hopefully) share my mindset, my heart warm and fuzzy being surrounded by thousands of books just waiting to be read. Trident Booksellers was established in 1979, a place for friends and students to gather together to talk, study, read, and imbibe the myriad of classical... Read More

Tea Time!

June 8th, 2017

I recently visited the Dashunbe Tea House in Boulder, an ornate and pristine Tea House located at the base of the Rocky Mountains and next to Boulder creek. The tea house is filled with authentic Asian sculptures, design, and art work and sells a wide variety of teas for any taste. The place has a substantial history behind it, having first been built in Dashubne, Tajikistan, Boulder’s sister city. It was constructed in Dashunbe in the 1990’s, then dissembled, crated up, and shipped to Boulder, where they rebuilt the building. This was performed as a symbol of friendship and cultural exploration,... Read More

Girl Power!!: The History of Women in Boulder

June 1st, 2017

In a recent study in Boulder, it was found that the city is leading the nation on gender equity. Currently, the national average for women’s wages are 84% of what men make. In Boulder the average is 88%. Boulder is obviously a special city, leading the nation in multiple avenues from preventative measures for climate change to progressive gender equality. This got me thinking about famous women in Boulder and the steps they have taken to catalyze change in their city and nation. If you were lucky enough to visit the Pioneers: Women Artists in Boulder exhibit last year at the Art Museum at... Read More

Be Bold, Be Boulder

May 25th, 2017

If you’re a running enthusiast in Boulder County you’ve probably heard about the Bolder Boulder 10k run. It’s the third largest road race in the United States and was recently named the best 10K by Runner’s World. There’s usually thousands of spectators, thousands of runners, random entertainment like slip n’ slides and music, outrageous running costumes, and it all starts this Monday on May 29th. The race first started in 1979 as a Memorial Day Tribute that still continues today. The fastest time for the 6.2 mile race occurred in 1995, with a man named Josephat Machuka, who ran it... Read More

What’s in a name?

May 11th, 2017

Boulder is a pretty interesting name for a city, don’t you think? Both a pronoun and a noun gives it a fairly unique affect. I was thinking about the reasoning behind of the name of the city, deducing (incorrectly) that it must have been named for some of the world class bouldering found around the Flatirons and in the surrounding area. But after some digging, I discovered that it was thought to be named after Boulder Creek, the thirty-mile creek flowing through downtown and outwards from the Rocky Mountains. There is no real consensus on this matter however, and very little information on the... Read More

It’s a bird! It’s a plane! It’s Super Drone!

May 4th, 2017

Boulder is once again putting its name on the map with a local drone engineering company that has just signed on with NASA. The company, named Black Swift, has just signed a $875,000 contract to monitor temperatures, winds, and gases at volcano sites, the data which will be used to better predict ash and other dangerous emissions that are propelled into the atmosphere. The Black Swift drones have already tested their stuff against fires, floods, and tornadoes, and now they are looking to conquer their next adversary. The Black Swift company was started by Jack Elston and Maciej Stachura, two Aerospace... Read More

Reduce, Reuse, Recycle!

April 27th, 2017

Last weekend was Earth Day, and Boulder citizens made their zeal for the environment and sustainability known with hikes and conferences downtown, kid’s activities in the park, and films at the Fiske Planetarium at the University of Colorado. Boulder is an exceptionally environmentally conscious town and I thought it would be interesting to look at the history of Earth day and what Boulder citizens have done to help and protect the environment. The first Earth Day occurred in 1970, and was started by then Senator of Wisconsin, Gaylord Nelson. After seeing a massive oil spill in Santa Barbara... Read More

Junius Henderson — The “Giant” of Natural History

April 20th, 2017

The Natural History Museum at the University of Colorado Boulder is a pretty fantastic place. It holds the largest collection of historical artifacts in the Rocky Mountains, possesses over four million objects, and has a diverse array of exhibits that would pique anyone’s historical interest. For the next few months, alongside the dinosaur bones and other permanent exhibits, the Natural History Museum will feature ‘Becoming Butterflies’, an exhibit which features the entire life cycle of a butterfly from chrysalis to winged beauty. It will also feature ‘Animals in Antiquity’, an exhibit... Read More

The CWA– The Conference on Everything Conceivable

April 13th, 2017

This week in Boulder, from April 10th-14th, the University of Colorado hosts the CWA or the Conference for World Affairs. It is a week-long gathering featuring lectures from prominent leaders across the world, including keynote speaker David Newman– NASA’s deputy administer, NFL Player Chris Borland, and Debra Eschemeyer, former Policy Advisor for Michelle Obama’s nutritional project, Let’s Move! The CWA is a veritable cornucopia of intelligent, ambitious minds lecturing on their successes and it’s been a fascinating experience listening in on different series. One lecture I attended... Read More

From Canvas to Streets– Street Art in Boulder

March 30th, 2017

Recently, walking around Boulder and taking in the sites, I’ve noticed an ample amount of street art, most notably drawn/painted/stenciled by SMiLE, an anonymous Boulder artist. SMiLE’s repertoire ranges from portraits of Jack Kerouac and Brad Pitt, to a menagerie of animals, most especially cats. A little less than a year ago SMiLE had an exhibition in Boulder titled ‘Streets to Canvas’, and made a profound statement on the website promoting the event. SMiLE states, “Art has always been in the vanguard of the worlds changing consciousness, and Street Art is the contemporary form of this... Read More

Pearl Street’s Past– The Turbulent History of Pearl Street

March 23rd, 2017

Pearl Street Mall—an iconic Boulder location where you can find all of your fjallraven or Patagonia branded outdoor needs, an espresso at one of the many coffee shops studded throughout the streets, or CU buff paraphernalia at one of the Campus Stores. Pearl Street is the lively epicenter of Boulder, drawing locals and tourists alike to get a taste of authentic Boulder. Pearl Street was first established in the 1860’s and thought to be named after one of the founder’s wives. Boulder began as a supply town for goldseekers, and the mall was first constructed due to a need for shops and provisions... Read More

Coffee Nation

March 16th, 2017

Coffee; the sweet, dark ambrosia that keeps us going throughout the day. In recent years, coffee has become a phenomenon that has seen the proliferation of Starbucks on seemingly every busy street corner, and Boulder has been no exception. However, luckily enough, Boulder possesses it’s more eclectic, independent coffee shops that have proven to be more popular hotspots for locals.           First, a brief history of coffee: Coffee drinking is thought to date back to the 15th Century in Ethiopia. Legend goes that a healer was exiled from his city and sent to live in... Read More

Pitch, Yaw, and Roll– The Crazy Jargon of Virtual Reality

March 9th, 2017

      Last week’s blog on the history of movies filmed in Colorado got me thinking about the evolution of television: how we went from theater and plays, to black and white silent shows, to full blown color and sound effects. Now, we have entered a new era of virtual reality and augmented reality, whereupon putting on some over-sized goggles allows us to be fully immersed in a movie or game, becoming actively part of the films we used to passively watch. How VR works Virtual Reality’s goal is total immersion—to trick your brain into believing that what you are seeing is real. Different... Read More

Lights, Camera, Action! — The history of movies filmed in Colorado

March 2nd, 2017

Ah, the Oscars. A time for us to rewind and remember all of the films that made us laugh, squeal, cry, and brim over with feeling. Over the weekend, we saw the awards go to Moonlight, Zootopia, and La La Land, and witnessed the emotional acceptances of some of the winners. I thought it would be interesting to look back on some of the famous movies that have been filmed right here in Boulder and in some of our close neighboring cities. Perhaps the most famous recent film shot in Colorado was “The Hateful Eight”, Tarantino’s latest film which featured a bounty hunter and his prisoner seeking... Read More

Brewing Beer?? — So that’s what your physics professors have been up to

February 9th, 2017

When patrons enter Boulder Beer Company, there is a hushed air of anticipation. Any bar really, seem to possess this strange, otherworldly quality, where this magical space—for a few hours at least—provides a jovial interlude for relaxation and good times, where people can forget their worries for a little while and indulge in a beer amongst friends and coworkers. Boulder Beer Co seems the pinnacle of such locations, with its good vibe atmosphere and surprisingly interesting (& eccentric) history behind it. Being a college town with hard-working students looking to blow off a little steam,... Read More

The Early History of Colorado and the University

February 2nd, 2017

Before Thomas Jefferson signed the Louisiana Purchase in 1803, and before Colorado became a state in 1876, the area was settled by numerous Native American tribes, predominantly inhabited by the Arapaho. The Arapaho were successful nomadic hunters, expanding their presence through trade, warfare, and alliances with other tribes. They were closely allied with the Cheyenne, which allowed their hunting territory to expand greatly and made them a formidable force. Much of their culture revolved around the idea of a warrior, which included not only skills in combat, but also in keeping peace, and in... Read More

Bouldering in Boulder?? — You know it’s gotta be good

January 26th, 2017

The history of rock climbing and bouldering had its genesis with mountaineering and alpinism in the late 18th century, although climbing rocks had been a feat accomplished long before. In the 14th century, a Native American tribe called the Anasazi drilled holes and carved stairs into rock cliffs in Chaco Canyon, but it wasn’t until 1786 with the first ascent of Mont Blanc, that the ‘modern era’ of climbing truly came into being. The history of Boulder’s rock climbing and bouldering history began a little over one hundred years later in 1896 when a group of Boulder Hikers formed the Rocky... Read More

Ghosts, Galas, and Gatsby?– The Hotel Boulderado is the one-stop-shop for all three

January 19th, 2017

I love this place. Not only for its colorful amalgamation of Colorado and Boulder (I see what you did there), nor for it’s weird synesthesia-effect of bringing to mind old  Eagles hits, but because it’s been around for over one hundred years, and that’s pretty frickin’ cool. I’ve bypassed the Hotel on my way to Ozo Coffee or after window-shopping and drooling over at the fjallraven store (*envious sigh*), but it wasn’t until recently that I realized this hotel had some pretty hefty history behind it. A plaque on the outside of the hotel reads: “Hotel Boulderado opened January 1st,... Read More

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