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Posts Tagged With ‘ study ’

 

Cannabis and Fitness Research Goes Mainstream

May 4th, 2019
cannabis and fitness

Cannabis consumers are typically portrayed as lazy, and have had the couch locked stigma association in mainstream media over the years. With new research from the University of Colorado Boulder released, the topic about cannabis and fitness is going mainstream. The stigma about cannabis consumers being lazy is being shattered by science. Men’sHealth, Maxim, The Denver Channel, Medical Marijuana, Inc., MSN and The Denver Post are just a few of many discussing the recent research. The research surveyed 600 adult cannabis consumers from states where cannabis is legal for adult use. When asked if... Read More

Cannabis Athlete Research for Holiday Cash

November 24th, 2018

Could you use some extra cash for the holidays? Are you active and consume cannabis? How about just active? If you answered yes to any of these questions, then you might qualify to participate in ongoing cannabis research right here in Colorado! There are several research studies being conducted throughout the state, and you can find one that fits you best. For any athletes out there who currently consume cannabis or haven’t consumed any cannabis products for the past 6 months, you could qualify for the cannabis activity study! The University of Northern Colorado Sport and Exercise Science Department... Read More

iGen More Likely Than Other Generations To Be Depressed

November 1st, 2018

A 2015 survey found that two out of three U.S. teens owned an iPhone. For this reason, the generation of kids born after 1995 is called iGen, coined by author Jean Twenge, author of a book on the subject. According to the Pew Research Center, smart phone ownership crossed the 50 percent threshold in late 2012 – right when teen depression and suicide began to increase. These increases in depression, suicide attempts and suicide appeared among teens from every background, across all races and ethnicities, and in every region of the country. The bottom line:  iGen teens are much more likely to... Read More

Drink Some Joe To Get Out of the Red

October 25th, 2018

Rosacea is a skin condition characterized by redness and often small, red, pus-filled bumps on the face. Over 3 million people are estimated to have rosacea and the signs and symptoms may flare up for a period of weeks to months and then diminish for a while. Rosacea can be mistaken for acne, an allergic reaction or other skin problems. The cause of rosacea is unknown, but it could be due to a combination of hereditary and environmental factors. A number of factors can trigger rosacea by increasing blood flow to the surface of your skin. Some of these factors include: Hot drinks Spicy foods Alcohol Temperature... Read More

The Science of Hugging for Health

October 11th, 2018

From birth to death, one of the most important parts of being human is the need for physical contact. Did you know that a firm hug can make you feel less negative emotion? Scientists found that getting a hug on the day of a conflict was linked to a slight rise in positive emotions and a comparable drop in negative ones, and appeared to linger into the following day. Evidence suggests that close physical contact — such as a hug — can play a part in reducing the risk of cardiovascular diseases, blood pressure, stress, loneliness, aggression, anxiety and depression. When you hug someone, you release... Read More

A New Vaccine for Cancer Is On The Horizon

October 4th, 2018

In 2018, an estimated 1.7 million new cases of cancer will be diagnosed in the United States and over 600 thousand people will die from the disease. Recently, a phase I trial was conducted testing a personalized vaccine’s ability to hold an aggressive group of cancers in check. The trial is the first step to determining if a vaccine can stop cancer in its tracks. The promising new cancer vaccine cured up to 97 percent of tumors in mice and will soon be tested in humans for the first time. Researchers from Stanford University will test the therapy in about 35 people with lymphoma by the end of... Read More

Procrastination May Be Hardwired into Your Brain

September 10th, 2018

Are you putting off until tomorrow what you could be doing today? If that’s you, it might not be just a personality trait. A study of over 250 men’s and women’s brain scans revealed that a brain region involved in motivation tends to be larger among people who put things off, while communication between that part of the brain and another involved in taking action appeared to be weaker. This study is the first to scan the brain to identify a neural basis for procrastination. Participants in the study were between the ages of 18 and 35 with no history of neurological or psychiatric disorders.... Read More

Living Diagnosis for Brain Injury on the Horizon

July 19th, 2018

Brain injury has been a hot topic of conversation since Dr. Bennet Omalu, a forensic pathologist, conducted the autopsy of Pittsburgh Steelers center Mike Webster in 2002. The autopsy led to his discovery of a new disease that he named chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE. CTE is the term used to describe brain degeneration likely caused by repeated head traumas. Symptoms of CTE include difficulty thinking, impulsive behavior, depression, short-term memory loss, emotional instability, substance abuse and suicidal thoughts or behavior. At present, diagnosing CTE can only be done after death.... Read More

The Laughing Goat

May 8th, 2018

The Laughing Goat coffee shop is on 1709 Pearl St. Honestly, the name was all I needed to draw me in. On the wall is a sign that says “Be Nice or Leave.” All of the customers seem to abide by this policy very nicely. Every single person is quiet in the cafe, except the staff, as they are discussing crazy Uber ride stories. I look around to notice there are gold little goats on the glass of the cafe, they look like they are dancing as opposed to laughing, but they still look happy just the same. They certainly add their own unique character. I notice that every single person here is alone; the... Read More

Cardiovascular Fitness May Be A Piece of the Puzzle for Reducing Risk for Dementia

March 29th, 2018

There’s a very strong connection between cardiovascular health—the health of your heart and circulatory system—and the health of your brain, so it makes sense that a longitudinal study of women indicated that those with the highest levels of cardiovascular fitness had an 88% lower risk for dementia. About 5.4 million people in the United States are estimated to be living with Alzheimer’s disease, the most common form of dementia. The Swedish study involved 191 women in Sweden, 38 to 60 years old, who completed an evaluation of their cardiovascular fitness. The women’s workload... Read More

Low Fat vs. Low Carb – Which Diet Works?

March 8th, 2018

It’s almost spring and many Americans start to think about dumping the winter plump in preparation for summer.  With that in mind, consider some recent information comparing dieting techniques and their success at helping you lose a few. Some dieters firmly believe in avoiding fat and while others espouse avoiding carbs. Does it matter? In a recent study at Stanford University researchers put more than 600 overweight adults on either a healthy low-fat or low-carb diet. It turns out, participants had similar levels of weight loss success on each plan. That’s right!  Both diets were successful. The... Read More

Food For Thought (Literally)

December 3rd, 2015

The best foods for your brain during finals — It seems that studying makes us hungry – that is, hungrier than usual. Boulder is full of delicious restaurants, but which ones are best for a studying student? Heres the DL: 1) Yellow Belly – Not too expensive, and you can get a little bit of everything. Some carbs, some protein and some vegetables. A popular combination includes grilled chicken, green beans and potatoes. $5-$8 2) Chipotle – The benefits of chipotle are obvious; you can get a lot of everything, in which every ingredient is non-GMO, no antibiotic and local. Chipotle... Read More

Not-So-Typical Guide to Midterms

October 8th, 2015

If you’re anything like me, midterms are the time for procrastination and self-inflicted stress. Sometimes, it’s hard to study a week, or even a few days, before a test. Since freshman year I have studied in a crunch-time sort of way. That is, the night before an exam. Although this method definitely works (most of the time) to get me the grade that I desire, it definitely doesn’t work to provide long-term gains in knowledge. I think that hardest part about this is coming to term with the fact that grades aren’t everything. Once this is known, studying becomes more for the... Read More

The Secret’s Out! Top 5 “Secret” Study Spots for Students

February 13th, 2015

Amidst the various well-know study outlets on Boulders campus, which include Norlin Library, the Leeds School of Business Library and the UMC, there are many gems that have yet to be uncovered by most students. These study spots are secluded, quiet and creative in comparison to the popular, go-to study spots previously listed. The 5th Floor of the UMC Beautiful view of the flatirons, quiet atmosphere and outdoor seating. Spark (on the Hill) Available classroom rental, quiet atmosphere and mentorship Classrooms Many options, lots of seating and quiet atmosphere CU Museum of Natural History Walls... Read More

The Art of Procrastination

December 13th, 2013

Finals week is upon us here at CU, which means that students all across campus are now utilizing their years of education and highly developed problem solving skills in order to come up with excuses to avoid studying. As a senior, I can safely say that I’ve become an expert on the subject. A black belted master in the art of putting things off, if you will. Heck, I’m even procrastinating right now by writing this blog instead of working on my English portfolio! Now, I would never recommend procrastination to any student. It’s a dark, treacherous road that can lead you to drink... Read More

The Seven Types of Professors You’ll Have at CU

October 4th, 2013

Whether you’ve just started school at CU or you’ve been around the block a few semesters, by the time you graduate you’ll be sure to have encountered each of these seven types of professors: 1. The Comedian: This professor views their classroom as a nightclub, and their students as an audience that just keeps coming back for more. Some are legitimately hilarious and will leave your abs (if only you had abs) aching from laughter, while others will make you want to hide your cringing face behind your textbook. Whether your professor is the academic version of Chris Rock, or a scholarly... Read More