Friday - August 17, 2018

Posts Tagged With ‘ study ’

 

Living Diagnosis for Brain Injury on the Horizon

July 19th, 2018

Brain injury has been a hot topic of conversation since Dr. Bennet Omalu, a forensic pathologist, conducted the autopsy of Pittsburgh Steelers center Mike Webster in 2002. The autopsy led to his discovery of a new disease that he named chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE. CTE is the term used to describe brain degeneration likely caused by repeated head traumas. Symptoms of CTE include difficulty thinking, impulsive behavior, depression, short-term memory loss, emotional instability, substance abuse and suicidal thoughts or behavior. At present, diagnosing CTE can only be done after death.... Read More

The Laughing Goat

May 8th, 2018

The Laughing Goat coffee shop is on 1709 Pearl St. Honestly, the name was all I needed to draw me in. On the wall is a sign that says “Be Nice or Leave.” All of the customers seem to abide by this policy very nicely. Every single person is quiet in the cafe, except the staff, as they are discussing crazy Uber ride stories. I look around to notice there are gold little goats on the glass of the cafe, they look like they are dancing as opposed to laughing, but they still look happy just the same. They certainly add their own unique character. I notice that every single person here is alone; the... Read More

Cardiovascular Fitness May Be A Piece of the Puzzle for Reducing Risk for Dementia

March 29th, 2018

There’s a very strong connection between cardiovascular health—the health of your heart and circulatory system—and the health of your brain, so it makes sense that a longitudinal study of women indicated that those with the highest levels of cardiovascular fitness had an 88% lower risk for dementia. About 5.4 million people in the United States are estimated to be living with Alzheimer’s disease, the most common form of dementia. The Swedish study involved 191 women in Sweden, 38 to 60 years old, who completed an evaluation of their cardiovascular fitness. The women’s workload... Read More

Low Fat vs. Low Carb – Which Diet Works?

March 8th, 2018

It’s almost spring and many Americans start to think about dumping the winter plump in preparation for summer.  With that in mind, consider some recent information comparing dieting techniques and their success at helping you lose a few. Some dieters firmly believe in avoiding fat and while others espouse avoiding carbs. Does it matter? In a recent study at Stanford University researchers put more than 600 overweight adults on either a healthy low-fat or low-carb diet. It turns out, participants had similar levels of weight loss success on each plan. That’s right!  Both diets were successful. The... Read More

Food For Thought (Literally)

December 3rd, 2015

The best foods for your brain during finals — It seems that studying makes us hungry – that is, hungrier than usual. Boulder is full of delicious restaurants, but which ones are best for a studying student? Heres the DL: 1) Yellow Belly – Not too expensive, and you can get a little bit of everything. Some carbs, some protein and some vegetables. A popular combination includes grilled chicken, green beans and potatoes. $5-$8 2) Chipotle – The benefits of chipotle are obvious; you can get a lot of everything, in which every ingredient is non-GMO, no antibiotic and local. Chipotle... Read More

Not-So-Typical Guide to Midterms

October 8th, 2015

If you’re anything like me, midterms are the time for procrastination and self-inflicted stress. Sometimes, it’s hard to study a week, or even a few days, before a test. Since freshman year I have studied in a crunch-time sort of way. That is, the night before an exam. Although this method definitely works (most of the time) to get me the grade that I desire, it definitely doesn’t work to provide long-term gains in knowledge. I think that hardest part about this is coming to term with the fact that grades aren’t everything. Once this is known, studying becomes more for the... Read More

The Secret’s Out! Top 5 “Secret” Study Spots for Students

February 13th, 2015

Amidst the various well-know study outlets on Boulders campus, which include Norlin Library, the Leeds School of Business Library and the UMC, there are many gems that have yet to be uncovered by most students. These study spots are secluded, quiet and creative in comparison to the popular, go-to study spots previously listed. The 5th Floor of the UMC Beautiful view of the flatirons, quiet atmosphere and outdoor seating. Spark (on the Hill) Available classroom rental, quiet atmosphere and mentorship Classrooms Many options, lots of seating and quiet atmosphere CU Museum of Natural History Walls... Read More

The Art of Procrastination

December 13th, 2013

Finals week is upon us here at CU, which means that students all across campus are now utilizing their years of education and highly developed problem solving skills in order to come up with excuses to avoid studying. As a senior, I can safely say that I’ve become an expert on the subject. A black belted master in the art of putting things off, if you will. Heck, I’m even procrastinating right now by writing this blog instead of working on my English portfolio! Now, I would never recommend procrastination to any student. It’s a dark, treacherous road that can lead you to drink... Read More

The Seven Types of Professors You’ll Have at CU

October 4th, 2013

Whether you’ve just started school at CU or you’ve been around the block a few semesters, by the time you graduate you’ll be sure to have encountered each of these seven types of professors: 1. The Comedian: This professor views their classroom as a nightclub, and their students as an audience that just keeps coming back for more. Some are legitimately hilarious and will leave your abs (if only you had abs) aching from laughter, while others will make you want to hide your cringing face behind your textbook. Whether your professor is the academic version of Chris Rock, or a scholarly... Read More